OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Zamora, B., Cookson, G. and Garau, M.

Consulting Report
September 2019

In England, an estimated 378,427 people receive palliative care each year in a range of specialised and generalised services. Overall, the quality of palliative care in England and the wider UK is widely regarded as excellent. However, despite the generally high level of care, many patients receiving palliative care die in pain every year. Yet, to date, there is little evidence of the scale of this problem. This study estimates that currently there are approximately 125,971 end-of-life patients receiving, or in need of, palliative care suffering from unrelieved pain.

The Office of Health Economics

Briefing
November 2018

This is OHE’s report to the Charity Commission for England and Wales for the year 2017, OHE’s first since becoming a registered charity in December 2016. It demonstrates some of the ways in which OHE has met its charitable objects: namely, to advance the education of the public in general/health care payers/policy makers on the subject of health economics and health care policy.

Chalkley, M and Sussex, J.

Briefing
September 2018

This OHE Briefing outlines the NHS ownership debate through the lens of economics. The aim of the Briefing is to improve understanding of how economics can or cannot help to resolve the question of whether the private ownership of health care provision is good or bad. The economics literature that informs this overview includes: the theory of the organisation of production; theories of behaviour and motivation and the role of incentives and payments in influencing decisions.

Towse, A., Cole, A., and Zamora, B.
Consulting Report
May 2018

The notion that the price of a medicine should be linked in some way to value it generates for patients and the health system is generally accepted. Yet, how can this be achieved, when increasingly medicines are being developed that derive patient benefit across many different indications? Indication-based pricing (IBP) has been proposed as a way to tackle this issue, permitting price to vary according to indication and – critically – according to value.

Cole, A., O'Neill, P., Sampson, C., and Lorgelly, P.

Consulting Report
March 2018

Surgical practice has and continues to develop at a tremendous pace, reflecting the evolving technological landscape as well as the expanding skillset of the surgical workforce. Minimal access surgery (MAS) can offer improved recovery prospects for patients, but uptake in the UK is variable across both procedures and hospitals.

Mulhern, B., Feng, Y., Shah, K., van Hout, B., Janssen, B., Herdman, M. and Devlin, N.

Research Paper
March 2017

Three EQ-5D value sets (the EQ-5D-3L, crosswalk and EQ-5D-5L) are now available for cost utility analysis in the UK and/or England. The value sets’ characteristics differ, and it is important to systematically assess the implications of these differences for the value generated. The aim of this paper is to compare the characteristics of the three value sets. In this Research Report we analyse and compare the predicted values from each of the three value sets, and also compare EQ-5D-3L and EQ-5D-5L data from patients who completed both measures.

Feng, Y., Devlin, N., Bateman, A., Zamora, B., and Parkin, D.

Research Paper
October 2016

EQ-5D data are often summarised by an EQ-5D index, whose distribution for its original version, the EQ-5D-3L, often shows two distinct groups in patient populations, arising from both the distribution of ill health and how the index is constructed. To date, there is little evidence about the distribution of the EQ-5D-5L index. This project aims to:

Cole, A., Lundqvist, A., Lorgelly, P., Norrlid, H., Karlsberg Schaffer, S., Lewis, F., Hernandez-Villafuerte, K., Lindgren, P., Garau, M., Welin, K-O., Bianchi, S., Althin, R., O’Neill, P., Persson, U., and Towse, A.

Consulting Report
September 2016

The economic burden that cancer poses on our society is staggering – 25 million years of healthy life lost, at cost of €126 billion including €52 billion in lost productivity – and continues to grow with the ageing of the population. It is imperative, in light of growing financial pressures on our health care systems, that we find ways to make the best use of available resources to deliver high quality cancer care to patients.

Feng, Y., Devlin, N., Shah, K., Mulhern, B. and Van Hout, B.

 

Research Paper
January 2016

Please note that a revised version of this paper has been accepted for publication and is forthcoming in Health Economics. There are some differences between the value set reported in the Health Economics version and the provisional value set reported in the OHE Research Paper version. Any use of the content of these materials is the sole responsibility of the user.

Devlin, N., Shah, K., Feng, Y., Mulhern, B. and Van Hout, B.

Research Paper
January 2016

Please note that a revised version of this paper has been accepted for publication and is forthcoming in Health Economics. There are some differences between the value set reported in the Health Economics version and the provisional value set reported in the OHE Research Paper version.

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