OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Hampson, G., Mott, D. Devlin, N. and Shah, K.

Consulting Report
January 2019

Whether or not society values curative therapies more highly (or less highly) than the sum of the iterative improvements that might come from conventional therapy has been highlighted as an important area for research. The aim of this research was thus to explore society’s preferences across curative and non-curative therapies and large and small health gains, via a discrete choice experiment.

Smith, P.

Monograph
January 2019

Debate about funding has highlighted the difficulty of persuading sceptics that the NHS is a good use of public finance. There is a widely held view – particularly in finance ministries and some sections of the media – that health systems such as the NHS are ‘black holes’, constantly demanding increased funding without concomitant returns to society.

Cole, A. and Towse, A.

Consulting Report
December 2018

The proliferation of health data in our ever more digitalised world of health care creates opportunities for better research around – and delivery of – pharmaceutical innovation. However, these opportunities may be constrained around the legal barriers to the use of health data for these purposes, which are poorly understood, particularly in relation to the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

The Office of Health Economics

Briefing
November 2018

This is OHE’s report to the Charity Commission for England and Wales for the year 2017, OHE’s first since becoming a registered charity in December 2016. It demonstrates some of the ways in which OHE has met its charitable objects: namely, to advance the education of the public in general/health care payers/policy makers on the subject of health economics and health care policy.

Chalkley, M and Sussex, J.

Briefing
September 2018

This OHE Briefing outlines the NHS ownership debate through the lens of economics. The aim of the Briefing is to improve understanding of how economics can or cannot help to resolve the question of whether the private ownership of health care provision is good or bad. The economics literature that informs this overview includes: the theory of the organisation of production; theories of behaviour and motivation and the role of incentives and payments in influencing decisions.

Ferraro, J., O'Neill, P. and Towse, A.

Consulting Report
August 2018

This OHE Consulting Report reviews “Measurement of Medicines Expenditure in the Context of the 2014-18 PPRS.” The project was funded by the ABPI.

For the year 2015/16, the Treasury reported growth in Government funded healthcare expenditure in the UK of 4.0% whilst NHS Digital reported medicines expenditure growth for the English National Health Service (NHS) for the same period at 8.0%. However, NHS Digital reported much reduced medicines expenditure growth for England of 3.5% for 2016/17, suggesting a complex underlying picture. NHS Digital growth rates are at list price as NHS Digital is not able to take account of rates of discount obtained by the NHS, which our analysis suggests are increasing, or of the rebate payments for branded drugs under the 2014-18 Pharmaceutical Price Regulation Scheme (PPRS).

It is important to stress that we are analysing data to understand trends since 2014. This work does not allow us to make any predictions about future trends.

Sampson, C., O'Neill, P. and Lorgelly, P.

Consulting Report
August 2018

In 2018, the NHS turns 70. This OHE Consulting Report demonstrates the contribution and impact of medicines to the health economy in the UK throughout the history of the NHS. Through interviews with experts we identified a shortlist of the most important medicines to have been brought to market, and from a review of the literature and evidence base we attempt to quantify the benefits of these key medicines in terms of health and economic outcomes.

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