Seminar Briefing

Mullin, C.

Seminar Briefing
January 2018

This seminar focuses on the NHS staffing markets and the use of temporary staff, specifically in the NHS provider sector, i.e. foundation trusts and NHS trust. (which include hospitals). To provide background and context, the discussion begins with an overview of the NHS labour market and the role of staffing agencies in providing temporary staff. The core of the seminar is an examination of previous strong growth in expenditure on such staffing, particularly during the early part of this decade; the effects to date of government intervention to address that spending; and possible lessons for other sectors from the limited evidence now available.

Grabowski, D.

Seminar Briefing
August 2017

This OHE Seminar Briefing summarises a seminar given by Professor David Grabowski, which provided a health economics perspective on how payment and delivery interventions can encourage high-value nursing home care. It took lessons from the U.S. effort to encourage high-value care and applied them to the UK, where we have similarly relied on regulation as the key guarantor of quality.

 

Hicks, N.

Seminar Briefing
February 2017

This OHE Seminar Briefing summarises a seminar given by Dr Nicholas Hicks, Co-founder and Chief Executive of COBIC (Capitated Outcomes-Based Incentivised Care). Dr Hicks describes COBIC’s outcomes-centred approach that has been adopted by NHS services across England and that brings together commissioners, providers, other professions, patients and carers.

Siciliani, L.

Seminar Briefing
June 2016

This OHE Seminar Briefing summarises a seminar given by Professor Luigi Siciliani on waiting time policies in the health sector from an international perspective, and highlights which policies have worked well in the last decade in OECD countries. Professor Siciliani also touches on methods for comparing waiting times internationally and where the UK stands in the international figures. Finally, the Briefing discusses waiting time inequality by socioeconomic status.

Mestre-Ferrandiz, J., Towse, A., Dellamano, R. and Pistollato, M.

Seminar Briefing
October 2015

Multi-indication pricing (MIP) involves setting a different price for each major indication approved for a medicine. As value is likely to differ across major indications, if prices paid for on-patent medicines are to reflect their value, then multi-indication medicines should have different prices across major indication, reflecting different values.

Birch, S.

Seminar Briefing
June 2015

It is often argued that the demands for increased healthcare expenditure arising from an ageing population, advancing technologies, and increasing expectations, warrant higher healthcare budgets. Professor Stephen Birch argues that this reactive approach is not sustainable, and that the perceived mismatch between resources and demand is due to poor health service planning. In this briefing, based on an OHE lunchtime seminar, Professor Birch presents a framework to re-focus planning models on population needs.

Pearson, S.

Seminar Briefing
March 2015

Dr Steven Pearson has convened a US policy workgroup of payers, drug and device manufacturers, patients' groups, and clinician specialty societies to help develop a “value framework”.

Grabowski, H.

Seminar Briefing
October 2014

Based on an OHE lunchtime seminar by Professor Henry Grabowski, this seminar briefing explores the lessons learned from Europe’s experience with biosimilars, and provides an analysis of how the US market may evolve.

Cook, J.P.

Seminar Briefing
April 2014

Based on an OHE Lunchtime Seminar, this publication addresses a persistent issue: how to adequately reward innovation through the pricing of new medicines given the limitations of the information available at launch. As the author points out, oncology drugs in particular often follow the path of incremental innovation, proceeding in steps towards realising their full potential in treatment -- and even cure.

Chambers, J.

Seminar Briefing
March 2014

Cost-effectiveness analysis plays a limited role in US health care compared to many other countries. In this Seminar Briefing, Dr James Chambers, Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health at Tufts Medical Center, considers the current use of cost-effectiveness analysis in the US and explores the potential value of including it in decisions about coverage for medical technology by Medicare (the national public health insurance programme primarily for people 65+ years of age).

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