Research

This research paper examines whether value of a life estimates used in economic evaluation differs between government departments in a selection of developed countries. The authors find that generally estimates used in transport and the environment exceeded those used in health, which suggests that health may be undervalued by departments of health compared to departments of transport or environment.

Members from the team at OHE attended the Health Economists’ Study Group (HESG) Winter 2021 Meeting, hosted online by the Centre for Health Economics in London, LSHTM, from 6th-8th January 2021.

In a new OHE Research Paper, Chris Sampson, David Parkin, and Nancy Devlin consider whether ‘dead’ must be used as an anchor in health state valuation. The authors are looking for feedback from readers to inform future research.

OHE has been awarded the status of Independent Research Organisation (IRO) by Research Councils UK. This blog comments on the significance of this achievement.

On the occasion of Adam Wagstaff’s death, Professor Tony Culyer reflects on his vast legacy to health economics, from Tony’s perspective of having been Adam’s PhD supervisor as well as a friend and collaborator.

This OHE Research Paper describes a study in which four stated preference methods for anchoring EQ-5D-Y values were compared: visual analogue scale, discrete choice experiment (with a duration attribute), lag-time time trade-off, and the recently developed ‘location-of-dead’ element of the personal utility function (PUF) approach.

Meet some of the OHE team at the Health Economists’ Study Group (HESG) Winter 2020 meeting in Newcastle, 6-8 January 2020.

OHE has been awarded a 3-year research grant by the Health Foundation’s Efficiency Research Programme to define an accurate measure of labour productivity in primary care and to identify its determinants, including workforce skill mix, technology and patient characteristics.

Chronic diseases affect individuals’ health status and its impact is reflected by the stock of health, which measures the amount of health of a population in a given period of time. In a new study published in Health Economics, Maria Errea and colleagues assess the health-related quality of life of a population using the EQ-5D-5L instrument to, first, estimate the impact of a set of 30 chronic diseases and, second, rank diseases according to their impact on the stock of health for a country.

Research by OHE and the University of Sussex into patients’ preferences for diagnostic tests aimed at reducing antimicrobial resistance has been published in Applied Health Economics & Health Policy. The research found that patients across Europe have different preferences, which may have significant implications for the design and uptake of diagnostic tests.

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