NICE

A paradigm shift is occurring in cancer care with the introduction of tumour-agnostic therapies, for which the indication is defined by the molecular signature of the tumour rather than by its location. While promising for patients, healthcare systems are facing major challenges with the clinical and economic assessment of such therapies and subsequent reimbursement decisions.

OHE publishes a research report sponsored by CRUK on the practical considerations for outcome-based payment in the NHS

This blog summarises an initiative taken by more than 300 health economists and experts in support of the creation of an independent health technology assessment agency in Spain.

This blog post summarises some of the more notable changes put forward in NICE’s methods consultation (November – December 2020), and comments on their potential consequences.

The inclusion of productivity value in the appraisal of health technologies is a subject of ongoing debate. In this blog, we discuss the potential impact of not considering productivity costs in the evaluation of vaccination programmes in the UK.

In a recently published OHE Consulting Report, we report the long-term return on investment (ROI) per £1 spent on various vaccination programmes from the perspective of the UK government. In this blog, we discuss how discounting affects the estimated long-term value of vaccination and, thus, decision-makers’ investment decisions.

OHE publishes a report quantifying the level of patient access associated with NICE ‘optimised’ recommendations.

Why might differences arise between child and adult QALYs? In the UK, NICE’s science policy and research team is reviewing NICE’s recommendations on child utilities and QALYs. In Australia, the Medical Research Future Fund has announced it will fund research for the PBAC on the topic. This blog sets out a conceptual framework addressing five key issues in measuring and valuing children’s health as compared to that of adults.

In light of concerns that not all medicines for ultra-rare (also known as ultra-orphan) conditions are appraised under the same NICE process, a new OHE Consulting Report discusses the distinct ethical and economic challenges faced by medicines for ultra-rare conditions, with particular reference to the challenges of HTA in the UK. A failure to consistently consider all ultra-rare disease medicines under the HST process could lead to inequalities in access and health outcomes for patients with ultra-rare conditions.

In 1994 Ben van Hout introduced the concept of the cost effectiveness acceptability curve (CEAC). In the 25 years since, the CEAC has become a standard part of health economic evaluations and incorporated into health technology assessment guidelines. Professors Nancy Devlin and Andrew Briggs spoke at a reception at ISPOR Europe this year to celebrate these contributions. As 2019 comes to a close, OHE reflects on 25 years of the CEAC.

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