Countering AMR

OHE has just published a new briefing entitled ‘Antimicrobials Resistance: A Call for Multi-disciplinary Action. How Can HTA Help?’

A new paper sets out an insurance model as part of a global solution to incentivise R&D for new antibiotics to tackle multi-drug resistance. It offers (i) a reasonable return on R&D; (ii) risk mitigation for payers, providers and manufacturers, (iii) stewardship by delinking revenues from volume of use, and (iv) conservation of antibiotic effectiveness by ensuring the continued availability of new antibiotics in the long-term.

Without new antibiotics, more patients will die from previously treatable infections. A key issue is how the value of antibiotics can be appropriately assessed by payers and HTA bodies.

Resistance to antibiotics is growing. Additional R&D is required. Both Transferable Intellectual Property Rights and Market Entry Rewards should be explored for use in Europe as a regional “pull” incentive.

In our daily lives, we take precautions routinely: we look both ways before we cross a road, and if we drive a car, we are constantly alert to avoid danger. This process does not require scientific ‘proof’. It is a natural process.  This so-called “precautionary principle” (PP) has...

The business model for antibiotics is broken. We looked at other industries facing conceptually similar challenges - particularly when the incentive for R&D is delinked from the volume of sales.

OHE long has been involved in analysing the nature of innovation and the effects of regulation. Two recent OHE presentations address the core issues.

The OHE model takes into account the value to society of new antibiotics as well as the risks and rewards for payers and the entities developing the new drugs.
A new model aimed at encouraging the development of new antibiotics was presented recently by OHE’s Chris Hoyle, who collaborated with Adrian Towse and Jorge Mestre-Ferrandiz in designing the model.

Antibacterial drug resistance is a serious and growing worldwide problem that threatens our ability to cure traditionally treatable diseases and to successfully perform numerous surgical procedures that rely on antibacterials. The current situation is due primarily to two causes: inappropriate use in humans and animals, and the decline in the development of new antibacterials, largely because of lower returns on investment in R&D. OHE has been very involved in both defining the challenge and thinking through possible responses.

Just published by OHE researchers is a comprehensive analysis of what policy measures are needed to counter the growing global problem of antimicrobial resistance. Their key findings are summarised in this blog post.

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