OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Cole, A. and Towse, A.

Consulting Report
December 2018

The proliferation of health data in our ever more digitalised world of health care creates opportunities for better research around – and delivery of – pharmaceutical innovation. However, these opportunities may be constrained around the legal barriers to the use of health data for these purposes, which are poorly understood, particularly in relation to the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

The Office of Health Economics

Briefing
November 2018

This is OHE’s report to the Charity Commission for England and Wales for the year 2017, OHE’s first since becoming a registered charity in December 2016. It demonstrates some of the ways in which OHE has met its charitable objects: namely, to advance the education of the public in general/health care payers/policy makers on the subject of health economics and health care policy.

Cubi-Molla, P., Mott, D., Shah, K., Herdman, M., Summers, Y. and Devlin, N.

Consulting Report
June 2018

Cancer survival rates have improved dramatically in recent decades due in part to pharmaceutical advances, with a growing range of increasingly effective and targeted medicines being developed, such as immunotherapies. In the economic modelling of such treatments, the question arises of which utilities should be assigned to patients who show a long-term, durable response.

In recent critiques of economic models in this area by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), the idea that long-term cancer survivors (LTCS) who have received such treatments could report quality of life (QoL) scores which are similar to, or higher than, those of equivalent general population samples has not been viewed as credible. This literature review examines whether there is evidence to support the assumption that the QoL of LTCS can be similar to that of age/sex-matched population samples.

This study was funded by Roche Products Ltd.

Zamora, B., Parkin, D., Feng, Y., Bateman, A., Herdman, M., and Devlin, N.

Research Paper
April 2018

This paper reports new methods for analysing the distribution of EQ-5D observations. The Health State Density Index and Health State Density Curve are used to summarise the extent to which people’s self-reported health on the EQ-5D is concentrated on a few health states, or distributed more evenly over a wide range of health states. This information can be useful in understanding patients’ treatment needs, as well as providing a way of comparing the nature of data provided by different patients or collected using different patient-reported outcome measures.

Lee, E.K., Park, J.A., Cole, A., and Mestre-Ferrandiz, J.

Consulting Report
September 2017

In 2015, OHE published a report which set out the core principles that should govern how Real-World Data (RWD) is accessed or generated, and used credibly to generate Real-World Evidence (RWE), thereby working toward a set of “international standards”. The analysis was based on a study of governance arrangements in eight key markets: the UK, France, Italy, Sweden, Germany, the Netherlands, Australia and the U.S.

In recognition of the expanding market for health care data in South Korea, the authors partnered with collaborators from SungKyunKwan University to extend this assessment to South Korea. In this report, the authors outline the current arrangements for the collection, sharing and use of RWD in South Korea, and assess how these compare with an “ideal”, facilitative framework for data governance.

Devlin, N., Shah, K., Mulhern, B., Pantiri, K. and van Hout, B.

Research Paper
August 2017

Standard methods for eliciting the preference data upon which value sets are based (e.g. time trade-off, standard gamble) generally have in common an aim to ‘uncover’ the preferences of survey respondents by asking them to evaluate a sub-set of health states. The responses are then used to infer their preferences over all possible dimensions and levels. An alternative approach is to ask respondents directly about the relative importance to them of the dimensions, levels and interactions between them

Yaman, F. and Cubi-Molla, P.

Research Paper
July 2017

Questions of happiness and well-being have increasingly been drawing the attention of health economists, with the understanding that its measures approximate quality of life, or at any rate is one of its major components. Happiness in surveys is typically reported as a rating scale.

Cubi-Molla, P., Shah, K.K., Garside, J., Herdman, M. and Devlin, N.

Research Paper
April 2017

Several studies have found differences in health state values by age. We investigate whether and how age affects respondents’ Time Trade-Off (TTO) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) valuations of hypothetical EQ-5D health states using data from the 1993 MVH UK valuation study. 

Devlin, N., Shah, K.K., and Buckingham, K.

Research Paper
February 2017

The aim of this paper is to consider what normative arguments might exist for advocating the use of any given measure of the average in the context of health state values. We begin by providing examples of the importance and implications of the choice of the measure of central tendency in stated preference studies (including both EQ-5D values and corresponding issues in the willingness to pay literature).

Fischer, A., Hernandez-Villafuerte, K., Latimer, N., and Henshall, C.

Research Paper
December 2016

This Research Paper reports on a literature review of trials using PFS as a surrogate for OS in oncology between 2012 and 2016; a workshop and interviews involving people from a regulatory agency (EMA) a “payer” organisation (NICE), academics, and from the member organisations comprising POI; and critiques of statistical modelling and economic analysis approaches to surrogacy.

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