Value, Affordability, and Decision Making

This blog summarises an initiative taken by more than 300 health economists and experts in support of the creation of an independent health technology assessment agency in Spain.

This research paper examines whether value of a life estimates used in economic evaluation differs between government departments in a selection of developed countries. The authors find that generally estimates used in transport and the environment exceeded those used in health, which suggests that health may be undervalued by departments of health compared to departments of transport or environment.

Cubi-Molla, P., Mott, D., Henderson, N., Zamora, B., Grobler, M. & Garau, M. 

Research Paper
February 2021

OHE explores the values of life that are used in analyses by the governmental departments of health, social care, environment, and transport, for a range of countries: Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea, The Netherlands, and the UK. In most of the countries explored in this report, there is evidence that the criteria for resource allocation used by government or its agencies in the health sector values life significantly lower than the other non-health departments. The authors present a theoretical model which suggests that the existence of different values of life across departments is not inconsistent with the idea of optimal resource allocation (in a static model) but only if perfectly counterbalanced by non-health attributes. Notably, some form of reconciliation is needed to correct the potential imbalance in the value of the same attribute (life) across public sectors. Reconciliation could range from reallocation of budgets, transfers of benefit, to adjustments of benchmarking thresholds.

Brassel, S., Neri, M. and Steuten, L. 

Consulting Report
February 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed the broad and devastating health, economic and societal impact of a highly infectious and deadly disease. In addition to the human suffering of COVID-19 patients, the pandemic is taking a heavy toll patients’ families, friends, colleagues, and other social networks. On healthcare staff working around the clock, wave after wave. And on the capacity of the NHS, buckling under the pandemic pressures with consequences that will last for years. Then, there’s the disastrous economic impact, crippling economies in the UK and worldwide.

Using medicines in combination can deliver better outcomes for patients across different tumour types and disease stages. Yet many HTA agencies do not find that the expected additional benefits from adding a new medicine to a currently reimbursed medicine represents value for money to the health system. In markets that utilise cost-per-QALY approaches for assessing value, a clinically effective medicine might even be found to be “not cost-effective at zero price” when used as part of a regimen that increases treatment duration.

Towse, A., Lothgren, M., Steuten, L. and Bruce, A. 

Consulting Report
February 2021

Using medicines in combination can deliver better outcomes for patients across different tumour types and disease stages. Yet many HTA agencies do not find that the expected additional benefits from adding a new medicine to a currently reimbursed medicine represents value for money to the health system. In markets that utilise cost-per-QALY approaches for assessing value, a clinically effective medicine might even be found to be “not cost-effective at zero price” when used as part of a regimen that increases treatment duration.

Histology independent therapies are changing the picture of cancer treatment and in so doing don’t ‘fit the frame’ of value assessment. What are the key challenges on the pathway from regulatory to Health Technology Assessment and how can we bridge those? This blog summarises expert and audience insights from an OHE-led ISPOR Educational Session, held Nov 9th 2020.

This blog post summarises some of the more notable changes put forward in NICE’s methods consultation (November – December 2020), and comments on their potential consequences.

Bernarda Zamora presented at the virtual event entitled ‘Value of Diagnostic Information in Heart Failure’, which was organised by Roche Diagnostics. The panel, composed of six experts representing a range of stakeholders across Europe, shared their insights and perspectives on the Value of Diagnostic Information (VODI), and explored policies and changes that need to be made to capture the outcomes of diagnostic information in heart failure treatment and management.

The Virtual ISPOR Europe 2020 will be commencing next week. A number of OHE researchers will be in attendance to present their research.

With the theme Improving Health: Establishing Incentives and Sharing Value, Virtual ISPOR Europe 2020 will question the fundamental conventions around value, risk, rewards, and the role of public and private sectors.

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