OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Lee, E.K., Park, J.A., Cole, A., and Mestre-Ferrandiz, J.

Consulting Report
September 2017

In 2015, OHE published a report which set out the core principles that should govern how Real-World Data (RWD) is accessed or generated, and used credibly to generate Real-World Evidence (RWE), thereby working toward a set of “international standards”. The analysis was based on a study of governance arrangements in eight key markets: the UK, France, Italy, Sweden, Germany, the Netherlands, Australia and the U.S.

In recognition of the expanding market for health care data in South Korea, the authors partnered with collaborators from SungKyunKwan University to extend this assessment to South Korea. In this report, the authors outline the current arrangements for the collection, sharing and use of RWD in South Korea, and assess how these compare with an “ideal”, facilitative framework for data governance.

Devlin, N., Shah, K., Mulhern, B., Pantiri, K. and van Hout, B.

Research Paper
August 2017

Standard methods for eliciting the preference data upon which value sets are based (e.g. time trade-off, standard gamble) generally have in common an aim to ‘uncover’ the preferences of survey respondents by asking them to evaluate a sub-set of health states. The responses are then used to infer their preferences over all possible dimensions and levels. An alternative approach is to ask respondents directly about the relative importance to them of the dimensions, levels and interactions between them

Grabowski, D.

Seminar Briefing
August 2017

This OHE Seminar Briefing summarises a seminar given by Professor David Grabowski, which provided a health economics perspective on how payment and delivery interventions can encourage high-value nursing home care. It took lessons from the U.S. effort to encourage high-value care and applied them to the UK, where we have similarly relied on regulation as the key guarantor of quality.

 

Yaman, F. and Cubi-Molla, P.

Research Paper
July 2017

Questions of happiness and well-being have increasingly been drawing the attention of health economists, with the understanding that its measures approximate quality of life, or at any rate is one of its major components. Happiness in surveys is typically reported as a rating scale.

Davies, Sally C.

Monograph
June 2017

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), created in April 2006, is a “virtual” organisation often referred to as the research arm of the NHS. It funds health and care research in the UK, translating discoveries into practical products, treatments, devices and procedures, involving patients and the public in all its work. The NIHR also ensures that the NHS is able to support the research of other funders, thereby encouraging broader investment in, and economic growth from, health research.

Karlsberg Schaffer, S., West, P., Towse, A., Henshall, C., Mestre-Ferrandiz, J., Masterson, R., and Fischer, A.

Briefing
May 2017

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) occurs when microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites change in ways that render the medications used to cure the infections they cause ineffective.

Hampson, G., Lichten, C., Berdud, M., Pollitt, A., Mestre-Ferrandiz, J., Sussex, J., and Towse, A.

Research Paper
May 2017

The Oxford Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) was established in April 2007. OHE and RAND Europe were commissioned by the Oxford BRC to undertake a programme of top-down evaluations of aspects of the impact of the BRC since its inception.

Ferraro, J., Towse, A., and Mestre-Ferrandiz, J.

Briefing
May 2017

Resistance to antibiotics is growing, posing a major health risk in rich and poor countries. Additional ways of rewarding R&D are required.

Mechanisms designed to encourage companies to undertake R&D on new medicines are generally characterised as either “push” or “pull” programs.

Towse, A. and Henshall, C.

Briefing
April 2017

The HTAi Asia Policy Forum meeting 2013 was held in Seoul, 13th -14th June 2013. This was the first of several annual meetings of the HTAi Asia Policy Forum. The topic of the meeting was: How can the available resources be used most effectively to deliver high quality HTA that can be used by health system decision makers?

This report represents the background paper for the meeting, as developed by OHE. The report begins by looking at the increasing interest in the use of HTA, how HTA has evolved, where HTA has got to in Asia.

Barnsley, P., Hampson, G., Towse, A. and Henshall, C.

Briefing
April 2017

The second HTAi Asia Policy Forum meeting (2014) was held in Manilla, 10th -11th June 2014. The topic of the meeting was: Transferability of HTA. This report represents the background paper for the meeting, as developed by OHE.

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