OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Rawlins, M.

Monograph
June 2013

In this monograph based his remarks at the 19th OHE Annual Lecture, Professor Sir Michael Rawlins examines the standards of proof required to show the effectiveness of a medical therapy. He traces the historical development of inductive and deductive approaches in science, discussing the strengths and weaknesses of each.

Sir Michael expresses concern that some view randomised controlled trials (RCTs) as the “gold standard” of evidence. RCTs, he argues, are very important, but other approaches to evidence development can prove equally valid in some circumstances.

Sussex, J., Rollet, P., Garau, M., Schmitt, C., Kent, A. and Hutchings, A.

Research Paper
May 2013

The purpose of this research is to identify the attributes to include in a value framework for orphan medicinal products (OMPs), determine their relative importance using a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) process, and test whether an MCDA approach can support decision making in practice.

O’Neill, P., Mestre-Ferrandiz, J., Puig-Peiro, R. and Sussex, J.

Research Paper
April 2013

Medicines account for less than 10% of total NHS expenditure in the UK. Because spending on medicines is easy to separate out, however, this sector continues to come under particular scrutiny in efforts to manage costs. Forecasting spending on medicines can be useful in planning NHS resource allocation. Simple extrapolations of past trends in medicines expenditure, however, are insufficient because they cannot account for shifts in the mix of medicines available on the market or the appearance of generics.

Shah, K. and Devlin, N.

Research Paper
December 2012

The UK Government is proposing to include "burden of illness" criteria in its scheme for value based pricing of branded medicines, potentially according higher rewards to medicines that treat more burdensome diseases. The 2010 Consultation Document includes a definition of burden of illness that incorporates both severity (length or quality of life) and "unmet need" (whether and what treatment exists). Little empirical evidence is available, however, on societal attitudes towards these definitions.

Shah, K., Tsuchiya, A., Risa Hole, A. and Wailoo, A.

Research Paper
December 2012

In 2009, the UK’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) issued supplementary advice that its Appraisal Committees are to consider when assessing treatments that extend life at the end of life.  This includes an option for approving such treatments for use in the NHS if certain criteria are met, even if base case cost-effectiveness estimates exceed the range usually considered acceptable.

Cookson, R. and Claxton, K. eds.

Monograph
November 2012

The Humble Economist is an outstanding collection of the most important essays by Prof Tony Culyer, a founding father of health economics. It distils a powerful set of ideas that have profoundly influenced health policy and decision making, and shows how reason and evidence can be used to improve decision making in any area of social policy.

Persson, U.

Seminar Briefing
November 2012

In this Seminar Briefing, Ulf Persson recounts Sweden’s experience with its approach to value based pricing (VBP). The model is a flexible approach that gives weight to cost-offsets outside the health sector and emphasises both encouraging innovation and enhancing access through such options as coverage with evidence development. He offers a series of examples to demonstrate how Sweden has addressed issues that any VBP system will face, including access to orphan drugs.

Garau, M., Towse, A., Garrison, L., Housman, L. and Ossa, D.

Research Paper
April 2012

Diagnostics not only facilitate health gain and cost savings, but also provide information to inform patients’ decisions on interventions and to clarify how their behaviour may affect their health. Current pricing and reimbursement systems for diagnostics, however, are not efficient and provide poor incentives for new diagnostic approaches.  Prices often are driven by administrative practice and expected production cost, rather than assessments of value.

OHE Commission

Monograph
January 2012

This report is based on the deliberations of the OHE Commission on Competition that was assembled in early 2011 "to consider the circumstances where competition between providers of health care might be both feasible and expected to yield benefits, and where not."

The members of the Commission possessed experience and expertise in competition/regulation economics, NHS economics, health policy, NHS management, and health care provision. Their views on competition in the NHS were divergent, meaning that the conclusions the Commission would reach were far from predetermined.

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