OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

O’Neill, P., Mestre-Ferrandiz, J., Puig-Peiro, R. and Sussex, J.

Research Paper
January 2014

The Pharmaceutical Price Regulation Scheme (PPRS) 2014 Heads of Agreement, announced on 6 November 2013, outlines the terms of the five-year deal between the pharmaceuctical industry and the government in the UK. For the first time, the PPRS caps future growth in the NHS's branded medicines bill, between 2014 and 2018.

Karlsberg Schaffer, S., Sussex, J., Devlin, N. and Walker, A.

Research Paper
December 2013

This research examines the use of QALY thresholds in NHS Scotland in 2012-13 for health services that were "at the margin", i.e. those for which investment or disinvestment was planned or occurred.

The study was based on information from three sources: public information from the Scottish Parliament's examination of the NHS Boards' expenditure plans, interviews with the Finance Directors of Scotland's territorial NHS Boards, and a literature review.

Mattison, N. ed.

Monograph
July 2013

Based on OHE’s 50th anniversary conference, this publication captures the views of thought leaders from around the world about the scientific and economic climate for drug development by 2022.

Four major themes stood out in the conference discussions, as reported in this publication.

1. Health care will be radically transformed as “precision” medicine plugs into the specific  genetic makeup of both patients and diseases, and is paired with increasingly powerful and convenient diagnostics.

Rawlins, M.

Monograph
June 2013

In this monograph based his remarks at the 19th OHE Annual Lecture, Professor Sir Michael Rawlins examines the standards of proof required to show the effectiveness of a medical therapy. He traces the historical development of inductive and deductive approaches in science, discussing the strengths and weaknesses of each.

Sir Michael expresses concern that some view randomised controlled trials (RCTs) as the “gold standard” of evidence. RCTs, he argues, are very important, but other approaches to evidence development can prove equally valid in some circumstances.

Sussex, J., Rollet, P., Garau, M., Schmitt, C., Kent, A. and Hutchings, A.

Research Paper
May 2013

The purpose of this research is to identify the attributes to include in a value framework for orphan medicinal products (OMPs), determine their relative importance using a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) process, and test whether an MCDA approach can support decision making in practice.

O’Neill, P., Mestre-Ferrandiz, J., Puig-Peiro, R. and Sussex, J.

Research Paper
April 2013

Medicines account for less than 10% of total NHS expenditure in the UK. Because spending on medicines is easy to separate out, however, this sector continues to come under particular scrutiny in efforts to manage costs. Forecasting spending on medicines can be useful in planning NHS resource allocation. Simple extrapolations of past trends in medicines expenditure, however, are insufficient because they cannot account for shifts in the mix of medicines available on the market or the appearance of generics.

Shah, K. and Devlin, N.

Research Paper
December 2012

The UK Government is proposing to include "burden of illness" criteria in its scheme for value based pricing of branded medicines, potentially according higher rewards to medicines that treat more burdensome diseases. The 2010 Consultation Document includes a definition of burden of illness that incorporates both severity (length or quality of life) and "unmet need" (whether and what treatment exists). Little empirical evidence is available, however, on societal attitudes towards these definitions.

Shah, K., Tsuchiya, A., Risa Hole, A. and Wailoo, A.

Research Paper
December 2012

In 2009, the UK’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) issued supplementary advice that its Appraisal Committees are to consider when assessing treatments that extend life at the end of life.  This includes an option for approving such treatments for use in the NHS if certain criteria are met, even if base case cost-effectiveness estimates exceed the range usually considered acceptable.

Cookson, R. and Claxton, K. eds.

Monograph
November 2012

The Humble Economist is an outstanding collection of the most important essays by Prof Tony Culyer, a founding father of health economics. It distils a powerful set of ideas that have profoundly influenced health policy and decision making, and shows how reason and evidence can be used to improve decision making in any area of social policy.

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