OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Series on Health
July 1970

inscription, 'Here lies Salvino Armato, the inventor of spectacles'. The inscription is probably inaccurate since both the Ancient Greeks and the Ancient Chinese were aware of the properties of crude forms of lenses in correcting visual defects. In medieval times, however, spectacles did first come in to use around the beginning of the fourteenth Century, during Armarto's lifetime. With the advent of printing and greater literacy in the population, the demand for spectacles increased.

Series on Health
July 1970

In 1948 the newly created National Health Service inherited a stock of buildings which varied very widely in both quality and quantity from area to area. Hospitals formed the major part of the existing health services' physical capital stock. With some exceptions, such as private nursing homes, these had been in the hands of either local authorities or voluntary bodies with the status of charitable institutions.

Series on Health
July 1969

The cost of dentistry now exceeds £100 million a year. In terms of a single specific illness or disease this figure is second only to the cost of mental illness and is greater than direct National Health Service expenditure on conditions such as pregnancy or the treatment of heart disease, bronchitis or tuberculosis.

Series on Health
July 1968

The total expenditure on medicines in the United Kingdom in 1966 was £267 million. Of this £188 million was for medicines prescribed on the National Health Service. The other £79 million was spent by the public mainly for medicines bought without a doctor's prescription. Thus self-treatment still forms an important aspect of medical care, although in terms of cost it accounts for less than half per cent of total consumer expenditure.

Series on Health
July 1968

WITH the inception of the National Health Service in 1948 the scope of general practice was enlarged to provide free medical care for each and every member of the community. It was envisaged at the same time that the general practitioner would become a 'family doctor', establishing a personal relationship with each of his patients similar to that previously enjoyed by only a small proportion of the population. In the event, a number of factors have made this difficult to achieve.

Series on Health
July 1967

In 1965 the National Health Service cost the nation over £1300 million of which the Hospital Service absorbed almost £800 million. Where such very large sums of money are involved, almost all of which are spent out of public funds, it is obviously important that the expenditure should yield the greatest possible value. This paper reviews trends in hospital spending and describes measures being taken to examine efficiency in the Hospital Service as well as the problems inherent in such efficiency studies.

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