Series on Health

Wells, N.

Series on Health
August 1982

One person in every four in England and Wales dies from coronary heart disease and at a minimum estimate the costs borne by the National Health Service in its treatment amount to £255 million. But of greater significance is the fact that it is a major cause of premature morbidity and mortality. Surveys indicate that at least one man in two will show evidence of diseased coronary arteries by the age of65 years (Morris 1975) and that 38 per cent of the 7 3,ooo male deaths between 30 years and retirement age are attributable to this cause.

Taylor, D.

Series on Health
April 1982

In 1972 the Office of Health Economics produced a paper entitled Medical Care in Developing Countries. Drawing on both information available within the pharmaceutical industry and the writings of commentators such as King (1966), Bryant (1969), Abel-Smith (1967) and Gish (1971), the report argued that medical resource allocation in most developing countries was too heavily biased towards urban, hospital based, curative medicine, OHE noted that in many poor countries two thirds to three quarters of public health spending goes on hospitals.

Laing, W. and Taylor, D.

Series on Health
March 1982

Of all forms of joint replacement operation, that for hips represents the most outstanding innovation. It is perhaps the major post-war surgical development and the key example of a technique which can radically improve quality of life at an acceptably low cost.

Wells, N.

Series on Health
January 1981

Official mortality statistics show that each year in England and Wales approximately 4,000 people take their own lives. By universal assent this figure understates the true incidence of suicide although to what extent remains unclear. Hospitals provide care for nearly 2,000 cases of deliberate non-fatal self-poisoning every week.

Taylor, D.

Series on Health
June 1980

Until the end of the 1960s leukaemia killed about 400 children annually in the United Kingdom. Excluding infant deaths (that is, those occurring in the first year of life) leukaemia alone was responsible for approaching 10 per cent of total child mortality at that time and between 40 and 50 per cent of all child cancer deaths. Amongst adults around 3.000 individuals were, and still are, lost each year as a result of one or another of the various forms of the illness.

Taylor, D.

Series on Health
April 1981

Produced easily by fermentation, ethyl alcohol has for at least 5 to 8 thousand years played a part in the development of human civilisation; as a medicine, as a substance endowed with religious significance, as a food and important element in many cuisines, as a fuel, as an economic good and as a disinhibiting/intoxicating drug used to aid social intercourse. It is in this last context that alcohol is most widely employed in the modern world.

Scoones, T.

Series on Health
March 1980

The purpose of this paper is to describe the nature of Huntington's chorea and to indicate broadly its costs to both society and affected individuals. The latter are usually high because the disease manifests in middle life when people normally experience their peak occupational and familial responsibilities. In fact such is the severity of the disablement it causes in its terminal stages that despite its rarity NHS and social service caring costs alone are estimated to be in the order of £4 million per annum.

Wells, N.

Series on Health
October 1979

Dementia — that is, irreversible and usually progressive destruction of the brain in old age, the causes of which have yet to be identified - is arguably the most significant single problem currently facing the health services. Ten per cent of the population aged 65 years and over (more than 700,000 people) are affected by the condition (s) and of these about half exhibit symptoms of a severe degree.

Taylor, D.

Series on Health
April 1979

More people of working age who are in hospital or disabled in the community suffer from schizophrenic illness than any other potentially handicapping condition. In the UK approaching 150,000 people are affected at any one time. The annual cost of their health and social care alone is some £200 million.

Series on Health
February 1979

Over the past few years serious efforts have been made in Britain and elsewhere to achieve a more rational distribution of health care resources. It has often been assumed that an optimum supply of health care facilities could be achieved by the measurement of objective health care needs, and that, then, these resources could be fairly allocated to those requiring them. Unfortunately, well intentioned as these attempts have been, the reality is that the problem is much more complex.

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