Policy, Organisation and Incentives in Health Systems

How can we identify efficiency variations across general practices and opportunities to improve their productivity if the measurement of output does not reflect the value produced? We propose a new instrument to measure the valued output of primary care in England.

A recent series of papers examines the effects of multiple primary health care interventions (introduction of health facility accreditation, introduction of user fees, and discontinuation of performance-based financing schemes) under Egypt’s Health Sector Reform Program between 2000 and 2014.

As the OHE continues to expand, we have another opportunity to welcome economists at a junior level to our team of talented researchers. Our team get the opportunity to work on a wide variety of policy-relevant projects across the health and life sciences...

Global TB deaths are increasing. CGD and OHE set out a “Market-Driven, Value-Based, Advance Commitment (MVAC)” that would create and guarantee a market for a breakthrough short, universal TB regimen tackling MDR strains. An earlier 1998 OHE publication argued for the UK to move from...

Cole, A., Cubi-Molla, P., Elliott, R., Feast, A., Hocking, L., Lorgelly, P., Payne, K., Peek, N., Sim, D., Sussex, J., Zhang, K and Steuten, L.

Research Paper
December 2021

Outcome based payment (OBP) is a flexible payment mechanism that links the price the NHS pays for a medicine to the outcomes it achieves in practice for NHS patients. In 2019 we published the results of a research study which described that OBP could help to accelerate patient access to some new medicines, ensure close monitoring of real-world patient benefit, promote value for money in NHS spending and support innovation.

OHE publishes a research report sponsored by CRUK on the practical considerations for outcome-based payment in the NHS

Around 10% of people in the United Kingdom (UK) have chronic kidney disease (CKD) according to Kidney Care UK. While CKD can be managed through diet and lifestyle changes in most patients, around 10% of them will suffer renal failure, where their kidneys no longer function well enough to support a normal, healthy life. Untreated, renal failure will ultimately lead to death.

Skedgel, C., Bulut, M. and Steuten, L.

Consulting Report
November 2021

Up to 5,000 people in the UK require a kidney transplant due to renal failure each year, but only about 3,000 transplants can be performed each year and around 250 people die each year while waiting for a transplant. To close this gap, it is important to find ways to make better use of the organs currently available. This includes improving post-transplant care to increase the likelihood of a successful transplant and extending the duration of graft survival, with the ultimate goal of “one transplant for life”.

In a commentary piece recently published in Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, OHE authors discuss how the misalignment in interpretations of the term ‘unmet medical need’ by different stakeholders has led to insufficient incentives for development in areas with urgent, genuine need, and propose a new framework for developing a more consistent understanding of UMN that will increase innovation.

Why is the measurement of efficiency in health care so important, but equally challenging? And why is it especially so in primary care? This blog provides an overview of these well-known issues, and offers a glimpse into the results of a new OHE analysis of approaches to measure efficiency in primary care and recommendations for future research.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Policy, Organisation and Incentives in Health Systems