Policy, Organisation and Incentives in Health Systems

Research Paper
December 2021

Outcome based payment (OBP) is a flexible payment mechanism that links the price the NHS pays for a medicine to the outcomes it achieves in practice for NHS patients. In 2019 we published the results of a research study which described that OBP could help to accelerate patient access to some new medicines, ensure close monitoring of real-world patient benefit, promote value for money in NHS spending and support innovation.

OHE publishes a research report sponsored by CRUK on the practical considerations for outcome-based payment in the NHS

Around 10% of people in the United Kingdom (UK) have chronic kidney disease (CKD) according to Kidney Care UK. While CKD can be managed through diet and lifestyle changes in most patients, around 10% of them will suffer renal failure, where their kidneys no longer function well enough to support a normal, healthy life. Untreated, renal failure will ultimately lead to death.

Skedgel, C., Bulut, M. and Steuten, L.

Consulting Report
November 2021

Up to 5,000 people in the UK require a kidney transplant due to renal failure each year, but only about 3,000 transplants can be performed each year and around 250 people die each year while waiting for a transplant. To close this gap, it is important to find ways to make better use of the organs currently available. This includes improving post-transplant care to increase the likelihood of a successful transplant and extending the duration of graft survival, with the ultimate goal of “one transplant for life”.

In a commentary piece recently published in Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, OHE authors discuss how the misalignment in interpretations of the term ‘unmet medical need’ by different stakeholders has led to insufficient incentives for development in areas with urgent, genuine need, and propose a new framework for developing a more consistent understanding of UMN that will increase innovation.

Why is the measurement of efficiency in health care so important, but equally challenging? And why is it especially so in primary care? This blog provides an overview of these well-known issues, and offers a glimpse into the results of a new OHE analysis of approaches to measure efficiency in primary care and recommendations for future research.

Case studies explored more and less successful practices when delivering healthcare across four priority areas (screening, disease management and standardised patient pathways, rational use of medicines and healthcare associated infections). Results were used to simulate cost-savings and patient outcomes that could potentially be realised with improvements in efficiency across the European Union of 27 countries and the United Kingdom.

OHE has been awarded a 3-year research grant by the Health Foundation’s Efficiency Research Programme to define an accurate measure of labour productivity in primary care and to identify its determinants, including workforce skill mix, technology and patient characteristics.

OHE Lunchtime Seminar with Rafael Bengoa and David Hunter, 14th October 2019. The seminar will discuss policy-level enablers and barriers for implementing large-scale health systems reforms.

Although the quality of palliative care in England and the wider UK is regarded as excellent, many patients receiving palliative care die in pain. This new study estimates that more than 5,000 patients would die in pain every year even under the ‘best practice’ palliative care such as that provided in hospices.

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