Economics of Industry

A Research Paper on the topic of incorporating life-cycle price modelling into pharmaceutical cost-effectiveness evaluations has just been published by OHE.

It is surprisingly hard to measure how long medical research takes. A recently published study by OHE, Brunel and RAND Europe shows a better way to do that.

Recently published study by OHE, Brunel University, RAND Europe and Kings College London analyses time lags in medical research and where to shorten them.

Dr. Aslam Anis, Director of the Centre for Health Evaluation and Outcomes Sciences (CHEOS) in Canada will undertake a short sabbatical with the Office of Health Economics in February 2015.

Based on an OHE lunchtime seminar by Professor Henry Grabowski, this seminar briefing explores the lessons learned from Europe’s experience with biosimilars, and provides an analysis of how the US market may evolve.

Teeling Smith, G. ed.

Monograph
July 1972

This paper is based on a symposium held at the Imperial College of Science and Technology by the Office of Health Economics in 1972.

Mestre-Ferrandiz, J., Sussex, J. and Towse, A.

Monograph
December 2012

The cost of R&D for a successful new medicine has been an important policy issue at least since the 1960s. Cost estimates matter not just because of intellectual curiosity or for industry understanding of its performance, but because they are a key aspect of the international debate about the reasonableness of pharmaceutical prices and the magnitude of the long-term investments involved.

Towse, A., Garrison, L. and Puig-Peiro, R.

Occasional Paper
February 2012

Interest is growing in schemes that involve “paying for pills by results”, that is, “paying for performance” rather than merely “paying for pills”.  Despite its intuitive appeal, this approach is highly controversial and is disliked by many health care providers, policy makers, and pharmaceutical companies.

Sussex, J., Towse, A. and Devlin, N.

Research Paper
August 2011

Recent reforms to the National Health Service (NHS) in England include important changes in the regulation of prices for new medicines. From January 2014, the existing Pharmaceutical Pricing Regulation Scheme (PPRS) will be replaced by “value based pricing” (VBP) for branded medicines sold to the NHS. This will apply only to new medicines; those marketed before 2014 will continue to be governed by the PPRS.

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