OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Hawe, E. and Cockcroft, L.

Monograph
October 2013

This publication provides both up-to-date statistics and a guide to finding and using health statistics from the UK and, to some extent, other OECD countries. Data are presented in easy-to-read tables and figures.

The OHE Guide helps answer these important questions:

Kobelt, G.

Monograph
September 2013

Since the second edition of this publication appeared in 2002, economic evaluation of new medical technologies as a basis for decisions about their use has expanded to an increasing number of countries and types of technology. At the same time, the methods themselves have evolved in response to experience and to changes in the ability to capture and analyse data.

Cubi-Molla, P., de Vries, J and Devlin, N.

Research Paper
July 2013

Significantly increases of wealth and health in the Western world over the past 50 years do not appear to have produced an equivalent increase in societal happiness, at least not using traditional measures. As a result, policy makers now are looking more closely at alternative ways of measuring the welfare of society, including measures of subjective well-being.

Mattison, N. ed.

Monograph
July 2013

Based on OHE’s 50th anniversary conference, this publication captures the views of thought leaders from around the world about the scientific and economic climate for drug development by 2022.

Four major themes stood out in the conference discussions, as reported in this publication.

1. Health care will be radically transformed as “precision” medicine plugs into the specific  genetic makeup of both patients and diseases, and is paired with increasingly powerful and convenient diagnostics.

Rawlins, M.

Monograph
June 2013

In this monograph based his remarks at the 19th OHE Annual Lecture, Professor Sir Michael Rawlins examines the standards of proof required to show the effectiveness of a medical therapy. He traces the historical development of inductive and deductive approaches in science, discussing the strengths and weaknesses of each.

Sir Michael expresses concern that some view randomised controlled trials (RCTs) as the “gold standard” of evidence. RCTs, he argues, are very important, but other approaches to evidence development can prove equally valid in some circumstances.

Sussex, J., Rollet, P., Garau, M., Schmitt, C., Kent, A. and Hutchings, A.

Research Paper
May 2013

The purpose of this research is to identify the attributes to include in a value framework for orphan medicinal products (OMPs), determine their relative importance using a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) process, and test whether an MCDA approach can support decision making in practice.

O’Neill, P., Mestre-Ferrandiz, J., Puig-Peiro, R. and Sussex, J.

Research Paper
April 2013

Medicines account for less than 10% of total NHS expenditure in the UK. Because spending on medicines is easy to separate out, however, this sector continues to come under particular scrutiny in efforts to manage costs. Forecasting spending on medicines can be useful in planning NHS resource allocation. Simple extrapolations of past trends in medicines expenditure, however, are insufficient because they cannot account for shifts in the mix of medicines available on the market or the appearance of generics.

Karlsberg Schaffer, S.

Research Paper
February 2013

Forecasters predict that the population of people aged 65+ in the UK will double by 2050, constituting a quarter of the total population. This will seriously challenge the NHS and the social care system. The ageing population is expensive: average NHS spending on 65+ households is nearly double that on households under 65 years of age. Formal care provided by the state, however, is not the only resource on which the elderly rely. England alone has nearly six million informal carers.

Shah, K. and Devlin, N.

Research Paper
December 2012

The UK Government is proposing to include "burden of illness" criteria in its scheme for value based pricing of branded medicines, potentially according higher rewards to medicines that treat more burdensome diseases. The 2010 Consultation Document includes a definition of burden of illness that incorporates both severity (length or quality of life) and "unmet need" (whether and what treatment exists). Little empirical evidence is available, however, on societal attitudes towards these definitions.

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