OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Series on Health
July 1965

The structure of the National Health Service today is tripartite in form. There is the Hospital Services sector accounting for about two thirds of the total cost; there is the General Medical and Pharmaceutical Services sector, which between them account for about one fifth of the total cost. The third major part of the National Health Service consists of the services provided by county councils and county boroughs in their role of Local Health Authorities which account for about one tenth of the total cost.

Series on Health
July 1965

Expenditure by the National Health Service in England and Wales on patients suffering mental disorders currently exceeds £130m. a year, about one-eighth of the total health services' expenditure. This large amount spent on mental disorder is only one side of the picture. The cost of treating diseases must be set against the cost of not treating them. More effective and expensive medical procedures may in fact reduce the total costs of sickness.

Teeling Smith, G. ed.

Monograph
July 1965

Based on a series of six lectures discussing some of the special considerations which arise when a science based industry has the government as a major customer in its home market, with particular reference to the relationship between the pharmaceutical industry and the National Health Service. The book challenges conventional attitudes to costing, pricing and marketing which in the past have been applied to science-based industry. The first paper discusses the influence of patents on the pattern of progress.

Series on Health
July 1965

When the National Health Service was first planned it was thought that apart from the effects of inflation, its cost would remain constant over the years or perhaps even fall as effective medical care reduced the volume of ill health in the community. In the event, costs have risen steadily, and it has come to be acknowledged that at least in part this is the result of extending the scope of medical care. Diseases for which there was formerly no treatment may now respond to newly discovered medicines or newly developed surgical techniques.

Series on Health
July 1964

The cost of the National Health Service in the United Kingdom now exceeds £l,000m. per year. Ten years ago, when expenditure was less than half this amount, the cost of the Health Service was the source of continued public concern. Cost was "the one aspect of the National Health Service which, since its inception in 1948, has given rise to more critical discussion and controversy than any other single issue". The controversy has now largely died away, and expenditure on the Service is no longer viewed with such alarm or disquiet.

Series on Health
July 1964

The explosive progress of medical science during the past twenty-five years has brought about a revolution in the health of the community and in the problems of sickness, disability and premature death. The discovery of new medicines and the development of new medical techniques extensively influence the total and the pattern of National Health Service expenditure, which in turn is a reflection of the changes in the procedures of medical care.

Series on Health
July 1964

A review of the incidence, impact and implications of minor and unrecognised illness in the community

This booklet is about the future of medicine. It presents information about the many sick people who do not consult their doctor hoping their symptoms will evaporate, in contrast to the many others who strike us as having more than their fair share of our time.

Series on Health
July 1964

The pattern of mortality changes as a community advances and matures. In under developed societies, mortality is greatest during the first five years of life. As the society develops, the greatest mortality occurs in the first year of life. In a community which has reached a high level of development, the main impact of mortality moves to old age.

Series on Health
July 1964

A feature of the development of Britain in the 19th century was the emergence of the organised professions. In medicine, law, engineering and accountancy, for example, there was the introduction or extension of formal training and minimum standards of admission. Professional qualifications restricted entry to those who had acquired sufficient skill and knowledge. Codes of practice were laid down by the professional bodies, who also became involved in questions of status and remuneration.

Series on Health
July 1964

Over the past 40 years, diabetes has changed from a progressive or rapidly fatal disease in to a controlled chronic disorder with mortality confined mainly to old age. The new picture dates from the isolation of insulin by Banting and Best at Toronto University in 1922.

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