OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Series on Health
July 1967

For many thousands of years man has sought and found artificial stimulants or sedatives to relieve the tensions of everyday living, to allay fear and worry or simply to  increase his pleasure. These have ranged from cannabis, the opiates and the juice of a Mexican cactus to alcohol, tobacco, tea and coffee.

Teeling Smith, G. ed.

Monograph
July 1967

Proceedings of a Symposium held at the College of General Practitioners, London
Sunday, 27 November, 1966

Teeling Smith, G. ed.

Monograph
July 1966

Proceedings of Colloquium held at Magdalen College, Oxford, Wednesday, 7th July, 1965

For the purpose of this meeting 'surveillance' was defined as describing 'procedures aimed at the protection of individuals against chronic non-communicable diseases'.

In preliminary discussions, it was clear that there were two aspects of the subject:

Series on Health
July 1966

In becoming aware of the size and severity of the problems of mental illness it is easy to overlook the great strides forward which have been taken in the lifetime of many of us towards the goal which I believe we can and will reach. That goal will be reached on the day when we shall have won against mental illness a victory as splendid and as much to the credit of mankind as the victory we have now won over tuberculosis — that adversary which for so long seemed unconquerable.

Series on Health
July 1966

In 1964 there were estimated to be 55,000 doctors actively engaged in medicine in England and Wales. In addition to these probably some 8000 to 9000 qualified doctors were not practising of whom about half had retired on grounds of ill-health or age. The two largest groups of those professionally employed were the 22,000 general practitioners and the 21,000 hospital doctors.

Series on Health
July 1965

In Great Britain during 1963, over 9¼m. new claims for sickness benefits were registered with the Ministry of Pensions and National Insurance. A total of nearly 300m. working days were lost during the year from June, 1962 in certified spells of sickness absence. This represents an average of 14 working days lost for each person covered by the insurance scheme. The amount paid in sickness benefits during 1962/63 exceeded £160m., a sum equivalent to approximately one-sixth of the total expenditure on the National Health Service.

Lee, M.

Monograph
July 1965

One of the consequences of ill health which can have the profoundest social and economic effect is a legacy of chronic and permanent disability. It may arise from many different disorders, and can take as many different forms as blindness, deafness, mental sub-normality or paralysis. Not only is each person disabled a unique individual, but each type of disability presents fundamentally different difficulties.

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