OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Asscher, A.W.

Early Diagnosis Series
July 1970

Urinary tract infection is probably the commonest bacterial infection. Although primary prevention is preferable to early diagnosis and treatment, in practice it is limited to the avoidance of unnecessary instrumentation of the urinary tract. Research on the defensive mechanisms of the urinary tract may widen the scope of primary prevention.

Series on Health
July 1970

Alcoholism has been a problem for many hundreds of years although the word itself is comparatively modem. Like schizophrenia it has, at various times, been described as a sin, a social problem, a disease and an emotional disturbance. Until recently it stood largely outside the field of public health. Alcoholism has been defined in terms of alcohol's adverse effects on the drinker, his family or society; in terms of getting drunk; in terms of the compulsive nature of drinking and, finally, in terms of specific recognisable physical or psychological symptoms.

Series on Health
July 1970

inscription, 'Here lies Salvino Armato, the inventor of spectacles'. The inscription is probably inaccurate since both the Ancient Greeks and the Ancient Chinese were aware of the properties of crude forms of lenses in correcting visual defects. In medieval times, however, spectacles did first come in to use around the beginning of the fourteenth Century, during Armarto's lifetime. With the advent of printing and greater literacy in the population, the demand for spectacles increased.

Series on Health
July 1970

In 1948 the newly created National Health Service inherited a stock of buildings which varied very widely in both quality and quantity from area to area. Hospitals formed the major part of the existing health services' physical capital stock. With some exceptions, such as private nursing homes, these had been in the hands of either local authorities or voluntary bodies with the status of charitable institutions.

Series on Health
July 1969

It has generally been the policy of OHE, in this series of occasional papers, to avoid controversial topics directly involving the pharmaceutical manufacturers, who still provide much of the finance for our Office. We are departing from the tradition on this occasion partly by accident and partly by intent.

Series on Health
July 1969

The cost of dentistry now exceeds £100 million a year. In terms of a single specific illness or disease this figure is second only to the cost of mental illness and is greater than direct National Health Service expenditure on conditions such as pregnancy or the treatment of heart disease, bronchitis or tuberculosis.

Series on Health
July 1969

At the last census in 1966 there were nearly 12 million people aged between 45 and 64 in England and Wales. This age group, which for convenience will be termed 'middle age' throughout this paper, covers the second part of economically active life. It is a time during which, while many careers are still reaching a peak, a decline in physical and mental powers has already begun to set in. As middle age is entered, a new phase of life begins. Patterns of morbidity and mortality rapidly alter as degenerative diseases become increasingly more significant.

Series on Health
July 1969

Attitudes towards the 'ideal' weight vary both from society to society and also over time. In many societies, large size and a big appetite are equated with health. In Tunisia and other parts of Africa, young girls are fattened-up for marriage, and the chieftain's prestige may be judged as much by his girth as by the number of his wives or children. The late Aga Khan, leader of the Mohammedan Ismailo Sect, was weighed every year on his birthday and if he had gained in weight he received gifts in precious stones and metals to the same amount.

Monograph
July 1969

By 1990, the total cost of the National Health Service will probably have reached about £10,000 million of which about £1,300 million will be for medicines prescribed by general practitioners and hospital doctors. At 1968 prices the corresponding figures would be about £4,500 million and £600 million.

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