OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Sussex, J., Towse, A. and Devlin, N.

Research Paper
August 2011

Recent reforms to the National Health Service (NHS) in England include important changes in the regulation of prices for new medicines. From January 2014, the existing Pharmaceutical Pricing Regulation Scheme (PPRS) will be replaced by “value based pricing” (VBP) for branded medicines sold to the NHS. This will apply only to new medicines; those marketed before 2014 will continue to be governed by the PPRS.

Hawe, E., Yuen, P. and Baillie, L.

Monograph
July 2011

Please note: an updated version of this publication is available here.

This publication provides both up-to-date statistics and a guide to finding and using health statistics from the UK and, to some extent, other OECD countries. Data are presented in easy to read tables and figures.

The OHE Guide helps answer the following questions.

Richards, M.

Monograph
July 2011

The speaker for the OHE's 16th Annual Lecture was Sir Mike Richards, National Clinical Director for Cancer and End of Life Care in England's Department of Health.

In his presentation, Prof Richards addressed five questions about the NHS achieving world class outcomes in cancer: (1) What would ‘world class’ look like (2) What measures are appropriate? (3) Where are we now? (4) Why are England's outcomes below the best? and (5) What do we need to do to close the gap?

Shah, K., Praet, C., Devlin, N., Sussex, J., Appleby, J. and Parkin, D.

Research Paper
May 2011

The appraisal of health care technologies by the UK’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellent (NICE) focuses on cost effectiveness, usually measured in terms of incremental cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained.  According to the findings presented in this Research Paper, however, cost effectiveness does not appear to be the dominant consideration in NHS decisions about resource allocation.

Sharma, P. and Towse, A.

Monograph
April 2011

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) to drugs is a natural and unavoidable consequence of treating infectious diseases.  A growing global public health threat, AMR reduces the chances of successfully treating patients with infectious diseases, thereby increasing the probability of complications, morbidity and mortality. The World Health Organization estimates that infectious diseases are the third leading cause of death in the European Union.

Garau, M., Mordoh, A. and Sussex, J.

Consulting Report
April 2011

Continuing concern about the fiscal deficit makes it likely that government funding of health and medical research will remain under scrutiny. This OHE Consulting study, commissioned by Cancer Research UK, explores the interdependence between publicly funded and charity funded medical research.  In particular, it focuses on whether and how changes in the levels of government funding can affect private funding for charities, medical research and the UK economy as a whole.

Towse, A. and Sharma, P.

Research Paper
April 2011

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is becoming a major global public health threat and has begun to command attention from European and US policy makers. An initial focus on monitoring AMR and conserving existing treatments by cutting down on misuse has been complemented by moves towards addressing the paucity of new drugs in the R&D pipeline of the pharmaceutical industry.

Devlin, N. and Sussex, J.

Monograph
March 2011

What a health care system should pay for depends, of course, on the health gain that results.  Health technology assessment (HTA) and cost-effectiveness analysis have become the core for many such decisions, by NICE in the UK and by similar bodies elsewhere.  Other factors, however, also are taken into account by the governments and insurers who fund health care.  These typically include: the impact of decisions on social equity; the quality of the patient experience; ramifications for the wider economy; and the quality of evidence required for decision

Watson, V., Sussex, J., Teeteh, E. and Ryan, M.

Research Paper
March 2011

The UK’s National Clinical Assessment Agency (NCAS) is designed specifically to provide advice on performance issues, on request, to NHS organisations employing or contracting with doctors, pharmacists, and dentists. Currently, the NCAS is financed from central NHS funds, not from charges to NHS organisations. By 2013, however, the NCAS is to become self-funding.

Pages