OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Donaldson, C.

Seminar Briefing
November 2011

Because health care resources always are scarce, decisions about what (and what not) to pay for cannot be avoided. Deciding how to value health and aspects of health care continue to be the subject of much debate. In this Briefing, Prof Donaldson takes a thorough look at the potential role of the willingess to pay (WTP) approach as a means for valuing the intangibles in health care. He examines whether more explicit monetary valuation of benefits, through elicitation of patients’ and the public’s willingness to pay, are not only useful, buy feasible and defensible in

Sharma, P.

Seminar Briefing
November 2011

Antibacterial drug resistance is a serious and growing worldwide problem that threatens our ability to cure traditionally treatable diseases and to successfully perform numerous surgical procedures that rely on antibacterials. The current situation is due primarily to two causes: inappropriate use in humans and animals and the decline in the development of new antibacterials, largely because of lower returns on investment in R&D.

Feng, Y., Farrar, S., Sutton, M. and May, A.

Research Paper
November 2011

This paper investigates how the increased rate of Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) payments implemented on 1 April 2005 affects Scottish general practitioners’ (GPs) intrinsic, extrinsic and overall motivation. A first difference method is used to model GPs’ intrinsic and overall motivation. The main finding is that the increased QOF payment effectively motivated GPs' health care supply, but it also 'crowded out' GPs' intrinsic motivation.

Dolan, P.

Monograph
November 2011

In this new report, Prof Paul Dolan provides an accessible guide into the latest developments in happiness research as they apply to the valuation of health.  This report considers the degree to which happiness data can overcome some of the well-known problems with existing preference-based ways of valuing health.  It presents new valuation data that show how the dimensions of health that matter most in happiness regressions are not the same as those that matter most when people are asked about their preferences.  In particular, mental health matters more in happiness reports

Sussex, J., Towse, A. and Devlin, N.

Research Paper
August 2011

Recent reforms to the National Health Service (NHS) in England include important changes in the regulation of prices for new medicines. From January 2014, the existing Pharmaceutical Pricing Regulation Scheme (PPRS) will be replaced by “value based pricing” (VBP) for branded medicines sold to the NHS. This will apply only to new medicines; those marketed before 2014 will continue to be governed by the PPRS.

Hawe, E., Yuen, P. and Baillie, L.

Monograph
July 2011

Please note: an updated version of this publication is available here.

This publication provides both up-to-date statistics and a guide to finding and using health statistics from the UK and, to some extent, other OECD countries. Data are presented in easy to read tables and figures.

The OHE Guide helps answer the following questions.

Richards, M.

Monograph
July 2011

The speaker for the OHE's 16th Annual Lecture was Sir Mike Richards, National Clinical Director for Cancer and End of Life Care in England's Department of Health.

In his presentation, Prof Richards addressed five questions about the NHS achieving world class outcomes in cancer: (1) What would ‘world class’ look like (2) What measures are appropriate? (3) Where are we now? (4) Why are England's outcomes below the best? and (5) What do we need to do to close the gap?

Shah, K., Praet, C., Devlin, N., Sussex, J., Appleby, J. and Parkin, D.

Research Paper
May 2011

The appraisal of health care technologies by the UK’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellent (NICE) focuses on cost effectiveness, usually measured in terms of incremental cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained.  According to the findings presented in this Research Paper, however, cost effectiveness does not appear to be the dominant consideration in NHS decisions about resource allocation.

Sharma, P. and Towse, A.

Monograph
April 2011

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) to drugs is a natural and unavoidable consequence of treating infectious diseases.  A growing global public health threat, AMR reduces the chances of successfully treating patients with infectious diseases, thereby increasing the probability of complications, morbidity and mortality. The World Health Organization estimates that infectious diseases are the third leading cause of death in the European Union.

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