OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Feng, Y., Parkin, D. and Devlin, N.

Research Paper
April 2012

The NHS Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) programme, introduced in April 2009, is a significant development in the routine collection and use of patient reported outcome data.  Data currently are collected for patients both before and after surgery for four elective surgical procedures in the NHS, with plans to expand the practice.

Towse, A., Garrison, L. and Puig-Peiro, R.

Occasional Paper
February 2012

Interest is growing in schemes that involve “paying for pills by results”, that is, “paying for performance” rather than merely “paying for pills”.  Despite its intuitive appeal, this approach is highly controversial and is disliked by many health care providers, policy makers, and pharmaceutical companies.

OHE Commission

Monograph
January 2012

This report is based on the deliberations of the OHE Commission on Competition that was assembled in early 2011 "to consider the circumstances where competition between providers of health care might be both feasible and expected to yield benefits, and where not."

The members of the Commission possessed experience and expertise in competition/regulation economics, NHS economics, health policy, NHS management, and health care provision. Their views on competition in the NHS were divergent, meaning that the conclusions the Commission would reach were far from predetermined.

O'Neill, P., Devlin, N. and Puig-Peiro, R.

Consulting Report
January 2012

According to the 1999 UK Department of Health consultation document, the fundamental purpose of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) was to reduce inequalities in access to innovative care and ensure more rapid access to medicines identified as being of value to the NHS. Since NICE’s debut in April 1999, several analyses have examined the uptake of technologies that have been considered by NICE, but no evidence has yet been published on whether and how NICE’s health technology appraisal (HTA) processes may have affected the speed of access to new treatments.

Mordoh, A.

Occasional Paper
December 2011

Prepared as background for the OHE Commission on Competition, this paper provides an overview of the published literature detailing the links between quality and competition in health care systems.  It finds that most empirical research to date has focused on aspects of competition and quality in the hospital sector, rather than GP/outpatient care.

Shah, K., Tsuchiya, A. and Wailoo, A.

Research Paper
December 2011

In 2009, the UK’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) issued supplementary advice that its Appraisal Committees are to consider when assessing treatments that extend life at the end of life.  This includes an option for approving such treatments for use in the NHS if certain criteria are met, even if base case cost-effectiveness estimates exceed the range usually considered acceptable.

 

Donaldson, C.

Seminar Briefing
November 2011

Because health care resources always are scarce, decisions about what (and what not) to pay for cannot be avoided. Deciding how to value health and aspects of health care continue to be the subject of much debate. In this Briefing, Prof Donaldson takes a thorough look at the potential role of the willingess to pay (WTP) approach as a means for valuing the intangibles in health care. He examines whether more explicit monetary valuation of benefits, through elicitation of patients’ and the public’s willingness to pay, are not only useful, buy feasible and defensible in

Sharma, P.

Seminar Briefing
November 2011

Antibacterial drug resistance is a serious and growing worldwide problem that threatens our ability to cure traditionally treatable diseases and to successfully perform numerous surgical procedures that rely on antibacterials. The current situation is due primarily to two causes: inappropriate use in humans and animals and the decline in the development of new antibacterials, largely because of lower returns on investment in R&D.

Feng, Y., Farrar, S., Sutton, M. and May, A.

Research Paper
November 2011

This paper investigates how the increased rate of Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) payments implemented on 1 April 2005 affects Scottish general practitioners’ (GPs) intrinsic, extrinsic and overall motivation. A first difference method is used to model GPs’ intrinsic and overall motivation. The main finding is that the increased QOF payment effectively motivated GPs' health care supply, but it also 'crowded out' GPs' intrinsic motivation.

Dolan, P.

Monograph
November 2011

In this new report, Prof Paul Dolan provides an accessible guide into the latest developments in happiness research as they apply to the valuation of health.  This report considers the degree to which happiness data can overcome some of the well-known problems with existing preference-based ways of valuing health.  It presents new valuation data that show how the dimensions of health that matter most in happiness regressions are not the same as those that matter most when people are asked about their preferences.  In particular, mental health matters more in happiness reports

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