OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Mattison, N. ed.

Monograph
July 2013

Based on OHE’s 50th anniversary conference, this publication captures the views of thought leaders from around the world about the scientific and economic climate for drug development by 2022.

Four major themes stood out in the conference discussions, as reported in this publication.

1. Health care will be radically transformed as “precision” medicine plugs into the specific  genetic makeup of both patients and diseases, and is paired with increasingly powerful and convenient diagnostics.

O’Neill, P., Mestre-Ferrandiz, J., Puig-Peiro, R. and Sussex, J.

Research Paper
April 2013

Medicines account for less than 10% of total NHS expenditure in the UK. Because spending on medicines is easy to separate out, however, this sector continues to come under particular scrutiny in efforts to manage costs. Forecasting spending on medicines can be useful in planning NHS resource allocation. Simple extrapolations of past trends in medicines expenditure, however, are insufficient because they cannot account for shifts in the mix of medicines available on the market or the appearance of generics.

O’Neill, P., Puig-Peiro, R., Mestre-Ferrandiz, J. and Sussex, J.

Consulting Report
October 2012

Since 1996, in its yearly PPRS Report to Parliament, the Department of Health in England has published international price comparisons of branded medicines used in the primary care setting. OHE Consulting uses the same methodology in this report to update comparisons through 2011.

Riccaboni, M.

Seminar Briefing
June 2012

This Seminar Briefing recounts the key points made by Prof Riccaboni, from the University of Trento, at a recent OHE Lunchtime Seminar.  It focuses primarily on the reasons for a decline since 2000 in the average number of new drugs launched per year by the pharmaceutical industry.  Factors identified as important include a trend towards targeting more complex and difficult diseases, the need to adapt to dramatic changes in scientific knowledge and in R&D approaches, and substantial changes in both the regulatory and marketing climates.

Mestre-Ferrandiz, J., Mordoh, A. and Sussex, J.

Consulting Report
June 2012

This report provides a clear explanation of the nature of innovation in medicines.  A fully revised and expanded version of the 2005 edition, it updates the literature review of the economics of innovation, traces important innovation that has occurred since 2005, adds new case studies and updates the discussion of competition in pharmaceutical R&D.

Sharma, P.

Seminar Briefing
November 2011

Antibacterial drug resistance is a serious and growing worldwide problem that threatens our ability to cure traditionally treatable diseases and to successfully perform numerous surgical procedures that rely on antibacterials. The current situation is due primarily to two causes: inappropriate use in humans and animals and the decline in the development of new antibacterials, largely because of lower returns on investment in R&D.

Garau, M., Mordoh, A. and Sussex, J.

Consulting Report
April 2011

Continuing concern about the fiscal deficit makes it likely that government funding of health and medical research will remain under scrutiny. This OHE Consulting study, commissioned by Cancer Research UK, explores the interdependence between publicly funded and charity funded medical research.  In particular, it focuses on whether and how changes in the levels of government funding can affect private funding for charities, medical research and the UK economy as a whole.

Garau, M., Towse, A. and Danzon, P.

Occasional Paper
February 2011

This paper examines the potentially positive impact of differential pricing in Europe and the overall negative effects of international reference pricing (IRP) measures. The authors point out that IRP actually encourages higher prices in lower-income countries, can delay marketing/patient access in lower-price countries, and ultimately translates into less investment in R&D. Differential pricing assumes that countries with lower incomes should pay lower prices, encourages the earliest possible marketing in all countries, and provides incentives for innovation.

Grabowski, H.G.

Seminar Briefing
January 2011

Priority Review Vouchers (PRVs) are awarded in the US to companies that gain approval there for a new drug for one of sixteen tropical diseases, under a law passed in 2007. The PRV entitles the holder to priority review by the FDA of another drug of the bearer’s choice.  The Vouchers are transferable, i.e., not limited to use by the company that gained approval of the neglected-disease drug.  

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