OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

O'Neill, P., Devlin, N. and Puig-Peiro, R.

Consulting Report
January 2012

According to the 1999 UK Department of Health consultation document, the fundamental purpose of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) was to reduce inequalities in access to innovative care and ensure more rapid access to medicines identified as being of value to the NHS. Since NICE’s debut in April 1999, several analyses have examined the uptake of technologies that have been considered by NICE, but no evidence has yet been published on whether and how NICE’s health technology appraisal (HTA) processes may have affected the speed of access to new treatments.

Mordoh, A.

Occasional Paper
December 2011

Prepared as background for the OHE Commission on Competition, this paper provides an overview of the published literature detailing the links between quality and competition in health care systems.  It finds that most empirical research to date has focused on aspects of competition and quality in the hospital sector, rather than GP/outpatient care.

Donaldson, C.

Seminar Briefing
November 2011

Because health care resources always are scarce, decisions about what (and what not) to pay for cannot be avoided. Deciding how to value health and aspects of health care continue to be the subject of much debate. In this Briefing, Prof Donaldson takes a thorough look at the potential role of the willingess to pay (WTP) approach as a means for valuing the intangibles in health care. He examines whether more explicit monetary valuation of benefits, through elicitation of patients’ and the public’s willingness to pay, are not only useful, buy feasible and defensible in

Shah, K., Praet, C., Devlin, N., Sussex, J., Appleby, J. and Parkin, D.

Research Paper
May 2011

The appraisal of health care technologies by the UK’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellent (NICE) focuses on cost effectiveness, usually measured in terms of incremental cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained.  According to the findings presented in this Research Paper, however, cost effectiveness does not appear to be the dominant consideration in NHS decisions about resource allocation.

Devlin, N. and Sussex, J.

Monograph
March 2011

What a health care system should pay for depends, of course, on the health gain that results.  Health technology assessment (HTA) and cost-effectiveness analysis have become the core for many such decisions, by NICE in the UK and by similar bodies elsewhere.  Other factors, however, also are taken into account by the governments and insurers who fund health care.  These typically include: the impact of decisions on social equity; the quality of the patient experience; ramifications for the wider economy; and the quality of evidence required for decision

O'Neill, P.

Monograph
November 2010

In December 2006, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) issued guidance for preventing and managing overweight and obesit. Recommendations are step-wise, starting with lifestyle changes and progressing through medicine to bariatric surgery. The guidance recommends that patients considered for bariatric surgery have either a BMI of 40 or more, or a BMI over 35 with an associated condition such as diabetes. Costing guidelines are included in the guidance.

Sussex, J., Shah, K. and Butler, J.

Consulting Report
October 2010

This research reviews how vaccines other than for travel or influenza are evaluated, procured and delivered in Australia. It includes observations as to whether and how the economic assessment process differs for vaccines compared to curative pharmaceutical products and implications of central purchasing for economic efficiency.

Sussex, J. and Shah, K.

Consulting Report
October 2010

This research reviews how vaccines other than for travel or influenza are evaluated, procured and delivered in the UK. It includes observations as to whether and how the economic assessment process differs for vaccines compared to curative pharmaceutical products and the implications of the current pricing approach.

Garau, M., Shah, K., Mason, A.R., Wang, Q., Towse, A. and Drummond, M.F.

Research Paper
October 2010

Current methods for constructing quality adjusted life year (QALY) measurements may be deficient for cancer patients in three respects: descriptions of health state, valuation of health state, and the source of values upon which measures are based.

Existing measures of health are either not sensitive enough or not attuned to cancer patients’ actual preferences.  For example, evidence suggests that the EQ 5D instrument does not capture the small changes in health that often are very important to cancer patients.

Culyer, A.

Briefing
June 2009

In the UK and elsewhere, choices about how to allocate health care resources are guided not only by economic calculations, but also by social value judgments such as those relating to equity and fairness. Factors such as uncertainty around key values, operational feasibility and stakeholder interests also need to be considered. The question of how to combine these inputs is central to the field of health care decision making.

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