OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Laing, W.

Monograph
March 1994

The recent pace of administrative change in the NHS has been rapid, culminating in the October 1993 decision to abolish the Regional tier of management and merge DHAs and FHSAs. This paper by William Laing is a timely and successful attempt to put these changes in context. It sets out the history of administrative change in the NHS since its inception in 1948, and the concerns that successive reform measures have been designed to address. As the paper shows, the internal market reforms cannot be seen simply as an aberration in the administrative development of the NHS.

Black, D.

Monograph
March 1994

Inequality in health is back on the political agenda in the UK. Three factors have made inequality an issue - firstly, concern that the internal market will enable some, notably patients of GP Fundholders, to get better treatment than other NHS patients, secondly, a revival of interest in community values, bringing with it a recognition of the impact of poverty on life expectancy, and thirdly, greater awareness that health care is being rationed, and will increasingly be so, irrespective of which political party is in Government.

Griffin, J.

Briefing
July 1993

That there is a positive association between unemployment and a variety of measures of ill health is clear. What is less clear is how this association arises. Two questions summarise much of the debate which has concerned researchers for many years. Firstly, does unemployment cause a deterioration in health or, conversely, are the sick more likely to become unemployed? If the latter, then the association is merely a statistical artefact. As unemployment starts to rise, employers lay of the relatively sick first, rather than the fit.

January 1992

AIDS poses a formidable challenge to African policy makers and health professionals. Of the estimated 9 to 11 million cases of HIV infection worldwide, some 7 million are in sub-Saharan Africa. In this largely impoverished region the AIDS pandemic has destabilised already precarious institutions and jeopardised the accomplishment of other pressing health objectives.

Blaxter, M.

Monograph
September 1991

The condition which was later to be called AIDS emerged in the early 1980s in several widely separated locations, including the United States, Haiti, Belgium, France, Zaire and Zambia. The first medical reports, relating to a cluster of cases among homosexual men in the United States, appeared in 1981. Less than 10 years later, the cumulative total of cases reported to the World Health Organisation had reached 334,216 by March 1991. Very few countries of the world have not been touched by the epidemic.

May 1991

In January 1989 the Government announced its proposals for reforming the National Health Service in the White Paper ‘Working for Patients’ (CM555). The two main objectives of the reforms, as outlined in the White Paper, are ‘to give patients, wherever they live in the UK, better health care and greater choice of the services available; and greater satisfaction and rewards for those working in the NHS who successfully respond to local needs and preferences’.

Teeling Smith, G.

Series on Health
January 1991

Outcomes, it is commonly said by general practitioners, are more difficult to measure in our discipline than those in hospital based specialties. This is true but it should not be used as an excuse for continuing sloppy work, for sufficient measures of outcome do exist to keep practices busy with audit for some time to come. We have good data - arguably the best in the world - about the incidence and prevalence of common disease in the community and where these can be linked to effective treatments we have a very valuable tool indeed.

Teeling Smith, G.

Briefing
September 1990

The objective of medical care is to improve people's health. This includes avoiding illness whenever possible, alleviating suffering and disability when illness does occur, and prolonging life, particularly through the prevention of premature deaths.

Robinson, R. and Griffin, J.

Briefing
July 1990

The Government's National Health Service reforms are designed to increase cost effectiveness, widen consumer choice and improve the quality of care. In making the case for these reforms, the White Paper Working for Patients (CM 555) pointed to the wide variations in performance throughout the health service.

Teeling Smith, G.

Series on Health
June 1989

The late John Vaizey posed a challenging question about the 'explosion' of health care costs in the Western World. 'Why was it seen as a problem'. he asked, 'when even more rapid growth for example in home entertainment and electronics was seen as an economic achievement?' Clearly, the answer does not depend only on the fact that Health Services in Europe are generally financed out of collective funds. In the United States, where much of medical care is still privately financed, 'cost containment' is an even more fashionable issue than in Europe.

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