OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Series on Health
July 1967

In 1965 the National Health Service cost the nation over £1300 million of which the Hospital Service absorbed almost £800 million. Where such very large sums of money are involved, almost all of which are spent out of public funds, it is obviously important that the expenditure should yield the greatest possible value. This paper reviews trends in hospital spending and describes measures being taken to examine efficiency in the Hospital Service as well as the problems inherent in such efficiency studies.

Teeling Smith, G. ed.

Monograph
July 1966

Proceedings of Colloquium held at Magdalen College, Oxford, Wednesday, 7th July, 1965

For the purpose of this meeting 'surveillance' was defined as describing 'procedures aimed at the protection of individuals against chronic non-communicable diseases'.

In preliminary discussions, it was clear that there were two aspects of the subject:

Series on Health
July 1966

In 1964 there were estimated to be 55,000 doctors actively engaged in medicine in England and Wales. In addition to these probably some 8000 to 9000 qualified doctors were not practising of whom about half had retired on grounds of ill-health or age. The two largest groups of those professionally employed were the 22,000 general practitioners and the 21,000 hospital doctors.

Series on Health
July 1965

The structure of the National Health Service today is tripartite in form. There is the Hospital Services sector accounting for about two thirds of the total cost; there is the General Medical and Pharmaceutical Services sector, which between them account for about one fifth of the total cost. The third major part of the National Health Service consists of the services provided by county councils and county boroughs in their role of Local Health Authorities which account for about one tenth of the total cost.

Series on Health
July 1965

Expenditure by the National Health Service in England and Wales on patients suffering mental disorders currently exceeds £130m. a year, about one-eighth of the total health services' expenditure. This large amount spent on mental disorder is only one side of the picture. The cost of treating diseases must be set against the cost of not treating them. More effective and expensive medical procedures may in fact reduce the total costs of sickness.

Series on Health
July 1965

When the National Health Service was first planned it was thought that apart from the effects of inflation, its cost would remain constant over the years or perhaps even fall as effective medical care reduced the volume of ill health in the community. In the event, costs have risen steadily, and it has come to be acknowledged that at least in part this is the result of extending the scope of medical care. Diseases for which there was formerly no treatment may now respond to newly discovered medicines or newly developed surgical techniques.

Series on Health
July 1964

The cost of the National Health Service in the United Kingdom now exceeds £l,000m. per year. Ten years ago, when expenditure was less than half this amount, the cost of the Health Service was the source of continued public concern. Cost was "the one aspect of the National Health Service which, since its inception in 1948, has given rise to more critical discussion and controversy than any other single issue". The controversy has now largely died away, and expenditure on the Service is no longer viewed with such alarm or disquiet.

Series on Health
July 1964

The explosive progress of medical science during the past twenty-five years has brought about a revolution in the health of the community and in the problems of sickness, disability and premature death. The discovery of new medicines and the development of new medical techniques extensively influence the total and the pattern of National Health Service expenditure, which in turn is a reflection of the changes in the procedures of medical care.

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