OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Towse, A., Hernandez-Villafuerte, K. and Shaw, B.
Consulting Report
May 2018

This OHE Consulting Report reviews “Estimated costs of production and potential prices of medicines for the World Health Organization Essential Medicines List” (Hill et al., 2018) in which the authors argue for “greater transparency in drug pricing” and propose generating estimates of the cost of manufacturing essential medicines to inform negotiations on drug pricing.

Ferraro, J., Towse, A., and Mestre-Ferrandiz, J.

Briefing
May 2017

Resistance to antibiotics is growing, posing a major health risk in rich and poor countries. Additional ways of rewarding R&D are required.

Mechanisms designed to encourage companies to undertake R&D on new medicines are generally characterised as either “push” or “pull” programs.

Towse, A.

Occasional Paper
December 2014

This OHE Occasional Paper by Adrian Towse discusses Professor Bengt Jönsson’s observations in a 2011 publication about the role of relative effectiveness research (RE) in the European medicines market and how this could lead to improved efficiency in the development of medicines, the pricing and use of medicines, and of health systems.

Towse, A., Garrison, L. and Puig-Peiro, R.

Occasional Paper
February 2012

Interest is growing in schemes that involve “paying for pills by results”, that is, “paying for performance” rather than merely “paying for pills”.  Despite its intuitive appeal, this approach is highly controversial and is disliked by many health care providers, policy makers, and pharmaceutical companies.

Sharma, P. and Towse, A.

Occasional Paper
October 2010

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) to drugs, a natural and unavoidable consequence of treating infectious diseases, is a growing global public health threat. The EU Commission is to develop comprehensive proposals by the end of 2012 for addressing the situation. This Paper is meant to provide input into those policy discussions.

The paper reviews AMR’s implications for the burden of disease, the causes of AMR, the current state of the antibiotic development pipeline and the reasons antibiotic R&D has been de-emphasised by biopharmaceutical companies.

For Schools
January 2007

For over a decade, the OHE website included a popular interactive e-source, The Economics of Health Care, focusing on the UK and aimed at post-16 students of economic courses. Because the details of how the NHS is organised have changed considerably, we have moved this material to the archive. We continue to make them available because the basic concepts of health economics and the types of issues the NHS faces have not changed.

Sussex, J. and Street, A. eds.

Monograph
October 2004

The material in this book is drawn from presentations and discussions at the conference "New Financial Flows for NHS Hospitals – Introducing Payment by Results in England: Some Lessons from Overseas" held at The Commonwealth Club, London, on 31st March 2004.

The conference was jointly organised by the Office of Health Economics and the University of York Centre for Health Economics.

Appleby, J. Devlin, N. and Dawson, D.

Monograph
July 2004

Prior to the 2002 Spending Review Derek Wanless was asked by the Chancellor of The Exchequer to assess the ‘financial and other resources required to ensure that the NHS can provide a publicly funded, comprehensive, high quality service on the basis of clinical need and not ability to pay.’ The resultant report on the future course of NHS spending was immensely important.

Robinson, R., Patel, D. and Pennycate, R.

Monograph
June 2004

Looked at overall, dental care represents a fascinating mix of the public and private spheres. It has a strong component that many people argue can be left to individual responsibility, private funding and market processes. But it also has a strong public dimension. How these areas are delineated, and how they are both catered for within the overall dental sector, poses some complex challenges. Analysing the nature of these challenges and pointing to ways in which they can be met is the purpose of this report.

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