OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Hernandez-Villafuerte, K., Shah, K., Herdman, M., and Lorgelly, P.

Consulting Report
March 2020

Meningococcal disease is a life-threatening infection and can result in severe sequelae. Recent scientific and technical advances have led to the discovery and implementation of novel meningococcal vaccines which have resulted in a substantial reduction in the burden of disease worldwide, representing a major public health achievement (Crum-Cianflone and Sullivan, 2016).

Gonzalez-Esuerra, J., Karlsberg, S. and Paling, S.

Seminar Briefing
February 2020

The NHS Improvement Economics team is part of the Strategy Directorate in NHS Improvement. NHS Improvement aims to implement changes to help improve both quality and efficiency. Recent research by the Economics team intended to support this has included research on A&E performance, NHS staffing, and inpatient falls.

Shah, K.K., Ramos-Goñi, J.M., Kreimeier, S. and Devlin, N.J.

Research Paper
January 2020

To date there have been no value sets to support the use of the EQ-5D-Y in cost-utility analysis. Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) can be used to obtain values on a latent scale, but these values require anchoring at 0 = dead to meet the conventions of quality-adjusted life year (QALY) estimation. This Research Paper describes a study in which four stated preference methods for anchoring EQ-5D-Y values were compared: visual analogue scale, DCE (with a duration attribute), lag-time TTO and the recently developed ‘location-of-dead’ (LOD) element of the personal utility function approach.

Devlin, N., Lorgelly, P. and Herdman, M.

Research Paper
April 2019

The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the issues that might limit comparability of PRO data and to highlight some of the evidence that exists on these issues. We note some of the implications for the development and use of PRO instruments, for their application in multi-country clinical trials, and for employing evidence from them in regulatory and reimbursement decisions. Although much progress has been made in this area, there is still scope for further research and improvement. Numerous factors can affect the comparability of PRO data across (and potentially within) countries and cultures. Failure to recognise and account for these differences could lead to incorrect conclusions about the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of new medicines and other health care interventions. We suggest areas where further research and enhanced guidelines for users of PRO instruments and data would be useful.

Sampson, C. and Garau, M.

Briefing
March 2019

The measurement of quality of life in the context of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is challenging. This is because the disease is experienced by children and is rare, which makes data collection difficult. This Briefing reports on a symposium that outlined some lessons that can be learnt from the SMA context that might be more widely applicable.

Cole, A., Cubi-Molla, P., Pollard, J., Sim, D., Sullivan, R., Sussex, J. and Lorgelly, P.

Research Paper
February 2019

OHE Research Paper 19/01: This report explores the feasibility of introducing one type of flexible payment mechanism –outcome-based payment (OBP) –for cancer medicines into the NHS in England. This model links the price the NHS pays for a medicine to the outcomes it achieves in practice for NHS patients. OBP could help to accelerate patient access to some new medicines and ensure close monitoring of real-world patient benefit. It can also promote value for money in NHS spending and support innovation. This is especially valuable against the backdrop of rising overall NHS spending on medicines.

Hampson, G., Mott, D., Devlin, N. and Shah, K.

Consulting Report
January 2019

Whether or not society values curative therapies more highly (or less highly) than the sum of the iterative improvements that might come from conventional therapy has been highlighted as an important area for research. The aim of this research was thus to explore society’s preferences across curative and non-curative therapies and large and small health gains, via a discrete choice experiment.

Cole, A. and Towse, A.

Consulting Report
December 2018

The proliferation of health data in our ever more digitalised world of health care creates opportunities for better research around – and delivery of – pharmaceutical innovation. However, these opportunities may be constrained around the legal barriers to the use of health data for these purposes, which are poorly understood, particularly in relation to the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

The Office of Health Economics

Briefing
November 2018

This is OHE’s report to the Charity Commission for England and Wales for the year 2017, OHE’s first since becoming a registered charity in December 2016. It demonstrates some of the ways in which OHE has met its charitable objects: namely, to advance the education of the public in general/health care payers/policy makers on the subject of health economics and health care policy.

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