OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Towse, A., Hernandez-Villafuerte, K. and Shaw, B.
Consulting Report
May 2018

This OHE Consulting Report reviews “Estimated costs of production and potential prices of medicines for the World Health Organization Essential Medicines List” (Hill et al., 2018) in which the authors argue for “greater transparency in drug pricing” and propose generating estimates of the cost of manufacturing essential medicines to inform negotiations on drug pricing.

Towse, A., Cole, A., and Zamora, B.
Consulting Report
May 2018

The notion that the price of a medicine should be linked in some way to value it generates for patients and the health system is generally accepted. Yet, how can this be achieved, when increasingly medicines are being developed that derive patient benefit across many different indications? Indication-based pricing (IBP) has been proposed as a way to tackle this issue, permitting price to vary according to indication and – critically – according to value.

This OHE Consulting report, funded by AstraZeneca, provides an overview of the key literature that has contributed to this debate, and of how IBP has been implemented – in its various forms – to date in the U.S., France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK.

IBP increases the potential number of patients who can benefit from a medicine and thus most economists regard it as efficient. It also sends the right signals for R&D investment. Differences of opinion remain, however, as to whether IBP is in the interests of payers. IBP may lead to some prices being higher than with a uniform price, as well as some prices being lower. The value at which prices are currently set in a single-price system will impact on the consequences of a move to a multiple-price system. A number of US payers see the potential for IBP to increase price competition in some indications, and the NHSE in England has used contracting by genotype in Hep C drug procurement to increase competition and help it get lower prices.

The literature evaluated as part of this report demonstrates that most of the debate is in the realms of theory, with little evidence in practice. The barriers are numerous. These include legal or regulatory hurdles, data collection problems, as well as contractual or financial flow issues.

Cole, A., O'Neill, P., Sampson, C., and Lorgelly, P.

Consulting Report
March 2018

Surgical practice has and continues to develop at a tremendous pace, reflecting the evolving technological landscape as well as the expanding skillset of the surgical workforce. Minimal access surgery (MAS) can offer improved recovery prospects for patients, but uptake in the UK is variable across both procedures and hospitals.

Through in-depth interviews with key stakeholders (surgeons from both the NHS and private sector, clinical directors and finance directors), supported by an evaluation of the literature, we assess the benefits of minimal access surgery, the extent to which these benefits are realised in practice, and the major barriers to wider adoption.

Lee, E.K., Park, J.A., Cole, A., and Mestre-Ferrandiz, J.

Consulting Report
September 2017

In 2015, OHE published a report which set out the core principles that should govern how Real-World Data (RWD) is accessed or generated, and used credibly to generate Real-World Evidence (RWE), thereby working toward a set of “international standards”. The analysis was based on a study of governance arrangements in eight key markets: the UK, France, Italy, Sweden, Germany, the Netherlands, Australia and the U.S.

In recognition of the expanding market for health care data in South Korea, the authors partnered with collaborators from SungKyunKwan University to extend this assessment to South Korea. In this report, the authors outline the current arrangements for the collection, sharing and use of RWD in South Korea, and assess how these compare with an “ideal”, facilitative framework for data governance.

Grabowski, D.

Seminar Briefing
August 2017

This OHE Seminar Briefing summarises a seminar given by Professor David Grabowski, which provided a health economics perspective on how payment and delivery interventions can encourage high-value nursing home care. It took lessons from the U.S. effort to encourage high-value care and applied them to the UK, where we have similarly relied on regulation as the key guarantor of quality.

 

Davies, Sally C.

Monograph
June 2017

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), created in April 2006, is a “virtual” organisation often referred to as the research arm of the NHS. It funds health and care research in the UK, translating discoveries into practical products, treatments, devices and procedures, involving patients and the public in all its work. The NIHR also ensures that the NHS is able to support the research of other funders, thereby encouraging broader investment in, and economic growth from, health research.

Hampson, G., Lichten, C., Berdud, M., Pollitt, A., Mestre-Ferrandiz, J., Sussex, J., and Towse, A.

Research Paper
May 2017

The Oxford Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) was established in April 2007. OHE and RAND Europe were commissioned by the Oxford BRC to undertake a programme of top-down evaluations of aspects of the impact of the BRC since its inception.

Ferraro, J., Towse, A., and Mestre-Ferrandiz, J.

Briefing
May 2017

Resistance to antibiotics is growing, posing a major health risk in rich and poor countries. Additional ways of rewarding R&D are required.

Mechanisms designed to encourage companies to undertake R&D on new medicines are generally characterised as either “push” or “pull” programs.

Hicks, N.

Seminar Briefing
February 2017

This OHE Seminar Briefing summarises a seminar given by Dr Nicholas Hicks, Co-founder and Chief Executive of COBIC (Capitated Outcomes-Based Incentivised Care). Dr Hicks describes COBIC’s outcomes-centred approach that has been adopted by NHS services across England and that brings together commissioners, providers, other professions, patients and carers.

Cole, A., Lundqvist, A., Lorgelly, P., Norrlid, H., Karlsberg Schaffer, S., Lewis, F., Hernandez-Villafuerte, K., Lindgren, P., Garau, M., Welin, K-O., Bianchi, S., Althin, R., O’Neill, P., Persson, U., and Towse, A.

Consulting Report
September 2016

The economic burden that cancer poses on our society is staggering – 25 million years of healthy life lost, at cost of €126 billion including €52 billion in lost productivity – and continues to grow with the ageing of the population. It is imperative, in light of growing financial pressures on our health care systems, that we find ways to make the best use of available resources to deliver high quality cancer care to patients.

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