OHE Publications

OHE releases a number of publications throughout the year, authored by OHE team members and/or outside experts. All are free for download as pdf files; hard copies of some publications are available upon request.

A description of the OHE publications categories.


 

Sussex, J., Rollet, P., Garau, M., Schmitt, C., Kent, A. and Hutchings, A.

Research Paper
May 2013

The purpose of this research is to identify the attributes to include in a value framework for orphan medicinal products (OMPs), determine their relative importance using a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) process, and test whether an MCDA approach can support decision making in practice.

O’Neill, P., Mestre-Ferrandiz, J., Puig-Peiro, R. and Sussex, J.

Research Paper
April 2013

Medicines account for less than 10% of total NHS expenditure in the UK. Because spending on medicines is easy to separate out, however, this sector continues to come under particular scrutiny in efforts to manage costs. Forecasting spending on medicines can be useful in planning NHS resource allocation. Simple extrapolations of past trends in medicines expenditure, however, are insufficient because they cannot account for shifts in the mix of medicines available on the market or the appearance of generics.

Karlsberg Schaffer, S.

Research Paper
February 2013

Forecasters predict that the population of people aged 65+ in the UK will double by 2050, constituting a quarter of the total population. This will seriously challenge the NHS and the social care system. The ageing population is expensive: average NHS spending on 65+ households is nearly double that on households under 65 years of age. Formal care provided by the state, however, is not the only resource on which the elderly rely. England alone has nearly six million informal carers.

Shah, K. and Devlin, N.

Research Paper
December 2012

The UK Government is proposing to include "burden of illness" criteria in its scheme for value based pricing of branded medicines, potentially according higher rewards to medicines that treat more burdensome diseases. The 2010 Consultation Document includes a definition of burden of illness that incorporates both severity (length or quality of life) and "unmet need" (whether and what treatment exists). Little empirical evidence is available, however, on societal attitudes towards these definitions.

Shah, K., Tsuchiya, A., Risa Hole, A. and Wailoo, A.

Research Paper
December 2012

In 2009, the UK’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) issued supplementary advice that its Appraisal Committees are to consider when assessing treatments that extend life at the end of life.  This includes an option for approving such treatments for use in the NHS if certain criteria are met, even if base case cost-effectiveness estimates exceed the range usually considered acceptable.

Garau, M., Towse, A., Garrison, L., Housman, L. and Ossa, D.

Research Paper
April 2012

Diagnostics not only facilitate health gain and cost savings, but also provide information to inform patients’ decisions on interventions and to clarify how their behaviour may affect their health. Current pricing and reimbursement systems for diagnostics, however, are not efficient and provide poor incentives for new diagnostic approaches.  Prices often are driven by administrative practice and expected production cost, rather than assessments of value.

Feng, Y., May, A., Farrar, S. and Sutton, M.

Research Paper
April 2012

In April 2006, payment thresholds were raised for GPs who participate in Scotland’s Ouality and Outcomes Framework.  GPs were required to meet new, higher thresholds on some indicators to receive maximum levels of payment.  In this paper, OHE’s Yan Feng and her colleagues examine whether this change in fact improved GP performance and whether the impact differed across GPs. Specifically, they examine whether low-, mid- and high-performing GPs changed behaviour and, if so, to what extent.

Feng, Y., Parkin, D. and Devlin, N.

Research Paper
April 2012

The NHS Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) programme, introduced in April 2009, is a significant development in the routine collection and use of patient reported outcome data.  Data currently are collected for patients both before and after surgery for four elective surgical procedures in the NHS, with plans to expand the practice.

Shah, K., Tsuchiya, A. and Wailoo, A.

Research Paper
December 2011

In 2009, the UK’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) issued supplementary advice that its Appraisal Committees are to consider when assessing treatments that extend life at the end of life.  This includes an option for approving such treatments for use in the NHS if certain criteria are met, even if base case cost-effectiveness estimates exceed the range usually considered acceptable.

 

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