OHE Publications

Maynard, A.

Monograph
January 2014

This monograph, based on Professor Maynard’s remarks at the 20th OHE Annual Lecture, explores the critical issue of ensuring the quality of care in the NHS. The lecture was delivered just five months after release of the Francis Report, which was the result of a public inquiry into serious failures in patient care at the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust. As with many such inquiries in the past, Francis’s recommendations envisioned more regulation.

O’Neill, P., Mestre-Ferrandiz, J., Puig-Peiro, R. and Sussex, J.

Research Paper
January 2014

The Pharmaceutical Price Regulation Scheme (PPRS) 2014 Heads of Agreement, announced on 6 November 2013, outlines the terms of the five-year deal between the pharmaceuctical industry and the government in the UK. For the first time, the PPRS caps future growth in the NHS's branded medicines bill, between 2014 and 2018.

Karlsberg Schaffer, S., Sussex, J., Devlin, N. and Walker, A.

Research Paper
December 2013

This research examines the use of QALY thresholds in NHS Scotland in 2012-13 for health services that were "at the margin", i.e. those for which investment or disinvestment was planned or occurred.

The study was based on information from three sources: public information from the Scottish Parliament's examination of the NHS Boards' expenditure plans, interviews with the Finance Directors of Scotland's territorial NHS Boards, and a literature review.

Dakin, H., Devlin, N., Feng, Y., Rice, N., O'Neill, P. and Parkin, D.

Research Paper
November 2013

In this Research Paper, the authors explore which factors have most influenced NICE decisions from 1999 through the end of 2011. The research has two objectives: identifying the influence of cost-effectiveness and other factors on NICE decisions, and investigating whether NICE’s decision making has changed over time.

Hawe, E. and Cockcroft, L.

Monograph
October 2013

This publication provides both up-to-date statistics and a guide to finding and using health statistics from the UK and, to some extent, other OECD countries. Data are presented in easy-to-read tables and figures.

The OHE Guide helps answer these important questions:

Kobelt, G.

Monograph
September 2013

Since the second edition of this publication appeared in 2002, economic evaluation of new medical technologies as a basis for decisions about their use has expanded to an increasing number of countries and types of technology. At the same time, the methods themselves have evolved in response to experience and to changes in the ability to capture and analyse data.

Cubi-Molla, P., de Vries, J and Devlin, N.

Research Paper
July 2013

Significantly increases of wealth and health in the Western world over the past 50 years do not appear to have produced an equivalent increase in societal happiness, at least not using traditional measures. As a result, policy makers now are looking more closely at alternative ways of measuring the welfare of society, including measures of subjective well-being.

Mattison, N. ed.

Monograph
July 2013

Based on OHE’s 50th anniversary conference, this publication captures the views of thought leaders from around the world about the scientific and economic climate for drug development by 2022.

Four major themes stood out in the conference discussions, as reported in this publication.

1. Health care will be radically transformed as “precision” medicine plugs into the specific  genetic makeup of both patients and diseases, and is paired with increasingly powerful and convenient diagnostics.

Rawlins, M.

Monograph
June 2013

In this monograph based his remarks at the 19th OHE Annual Lecture, Professor Sir Michael Rawlins examines the standards of proof required to show the effectiveness of a medical therapy. He traces the historical development of inductive and deductive approaches in science, discussing the strengths and weaknesses of each.

Sir Michael expresses concern that some view randomised controlled trials (RCTs) as the “gold standard” of evidence. RCTs, he argues, are very important, but other approaches to evidence development can prove equally valid in some circumstances.

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