OHE Publications

Worlock, A.

Monograph
July 1983

The Office of Health Economics has recently widened its scope to take a special interest in the health care problems of the Poor World, with particular reference to. the role of  medicines.

As a contribution to the discussion in this area, OHE is publishing this paper, which was delivered by Dr Arnold Warlock of The Wellcome Foundation Ltd at the 11th Assembly of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers' Associations in Washington in June 1982.

Teeling Smith, G. ed.

Monograph
July 1983

There has been a spectacular explosion of therapeutic progress over the past 35 years. The consequent improvements in public health may seem self-evident. Why, then, is it necessary to employ the disciplines of economics and sociology to try to quantify these benefits? This introduction sets out to answer this question. It also looks at some of the earlier ways in which benefits have been quantified, and it discusses the reasons why new and more sophisticated methods of measurement are needed in the 1980s.

Leisinger, K.M.

Monograph
May 1983

Unlike the great majority of OHE publications, this paper was not researched and written 'in-house'. It is a minimally edited translation of a study prepared in German by Dr Klaus Leisinger of the Swiss company CIBA-GEIGY. Hence its style, and at certain points its interpretation, differs from that of OHE; yet as regards the basic sentiments expressed OHE fully supports the line taken.

Taylor, D.

Monograph
January 1983

In his Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, which was first published in 1776, Adam Smith placed special emphasis on the assertion that the ultimate purpose of producing any good (or service) is to meet the needs of its consumers. The economists of Western Europe and North America who have built on such thinking over the past two centuries have developed it into what is often referred to as the theory of consumer sovereignty.

Teeling Smith, G.

Monograph
November 1982

Conference of Scottish Pharmacists, Aviemore, 21 November 1982.

The aim is to do two things. First, to put the experience with benoxaprofen into a broader and cooler perspective. Secondly, to spell out a theoretical framework from which to develop a more rational attitude towards "adverse reactions" in the future.

Vaizey, J.

Briefing
October 1982

People pay for some health care themselves out of income and savings. In Britain, out of a total expenditure on health care of all kinds of £ 13,700 million in 1981 it is estimated that some 3.0 per cent was paid for in this way, partly for non-prescription medicines. They also claim health care insurance. In 1981, BUPA and other health insurance agencies paid out almost £205 million, or 1.5 per cent of the total expenditure.

Teeling Smith, G.

Briefing
September 1982

Previous studies concerned with the benefits of modern medicines have concentrated mainly on their economic consequences (Wells NEJ 1980; Teeling-Smith G 1982).

Wells, N.

Series on Health
August 1982

One person in every four in England and Wales dies from coronary heart disease and at a minimum estimate the costs borne by the National Health Service in its treatment amount to £255 million. But of greater significance is the fact that it is a major cause of premature morbidity and mortality. Surveys indicate that at least one man in two will show evidence of diseased coronary arteries by the age of65 years (Morris 1975) and that 38 per cent of the 7 3,ooo male deaths between 30 years and retirement age are attributable to this cause.

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