Series on Health

Teeling Smith, G.

Series on Health
June 1986

This paper from the Office of Health Economics contains some of the newer ideas which have been floated in order to tackle the economic problems urgently facing the National Health Service in 1986. It is postulated on the belief that the service not only needs additional public funds, but also needs to look at new economic principles in relation to its organisation. Above all there needs to be a better informed debate about the economics of health.

Chew, R.

Series on Health
May 1986

Wells, N.

Series on Health
April 1986

In 1983 almost £6.6 billion was spent on research and development in the United Kingdom. This sum was five times that recorded in 1972 and even when account is taken of the high levels of inflation experienced over the period, this increase still represents real growth of 28 per cent. The resources channelled into research and development now account for 2.55 per cent of gross domestic product and are approximately equivalent to combined central and local government spending on housing or consumer expenditure on tobacco (1983 data).

Capewell, G.

Series on Health
March 1986

Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the most common genetically determined disease in Britain. Each year about 400 infants are born with the disorder and of these probably less than 25 per cent will survive into their 30s.

Laing, W.

Series on Health
July 1985

This survey covers all major areas of health care in Britain and describes the activity of the private and voluntary sectors in each. The organisation of chapters aims to follow coherent market boundaries. In many cases, these coincide roughly with NHS administrative divisions. The congruence breaks down, however, in the case of long term nursing and residential care of elderly people.

Wells, N.

Series on Health
July 1985

Back pain is a symptom experienced by a large proportion of the population. It causes personal discomfort and national economic loss of a magnitude wholly misrepresented by that which might be inferred from its characterisation as the malingerer's complaint and its adoption as a target for humour. Indeed such are the consequences of back pain that in 1976 the then Minister of State for Health, Dr David Owen, established a multi-disciplinary Working Group to investigate the problem.

Teeling Smith, G.

Series on Health
June 1985

Expenditure on health care is continuing to rise in all Western countries, both in total and as a percentage of gross national product (Table 1). This has underlined the political importance of demonstrating that this expenditure is giving value for money, both in specific instances and in its totality.

Wells, N.

Series on Health
July 1984

The historical roots of immunisation can probably be traced back to ancient Greek and Chinese civilisations and the observation that adults who survived an attack of smallpox did not usually contract the disease a second time. Yet the 'modern era' is perhaps generally regarded as having commenced at the end of the eighteenth century with Jenner's demonstration that smallpox could be prevented by first 'vaccinating' individuals with cowpox.

Taylor, D.

Series on Health
May 1984

The National Health Service will spend around £17,000 million in the UK in 1984: it employs more than 1.2 million full-time and part-time staff. Thus as well as being very probably the nation's most popular major institution (Iglehart 1983, 1984), it is also its largest. The NHS today utilises around 6 per cent of the country's gross national product and a similar proportion of its manpower resources. This is not far short of double the share enjoyed by the health sector in the years immediately after 1948.

Wells, N.

Series on Health
October 1983

Therapeutic progress in recent decades has made a major contribution to reductions in mortality and has extended control to the symptoms of many chronic diseases. Thus developments in chemotherapy and immunisation have combined with economic, social and environmental improvement to bring about the restructuring of mortality profiles illustrated in Figure 1.

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