Research Paper

Parkin, D., Devlin, N. and Feng, Y.

Research Paper
August 2014

The EQ-5D is one of the most used health-related quality of life instruments worldwide. Understanding the characteristics of its underlying data is essential. In this paper, OHE’s Nancy Devlin and Yan Feng join David Parkin from King’s College London in analyzing characteristics of the EQ-5D indexing process that may obscure useful, and important, information about health states.

Karlsberg Schaffer, S., Sussex, J., Hughes, D. and Devlin, N.

Research Paper
June 2014

This new research from the OHE examines how Local Health Boards (LHBs) in Wales adjust spending to meet the statutory requirement of providing access to technologies recommended by NICE within three months after NICE publishes a Technology Appraisal (TA). Based on interviews with medical and/or finance directors of the seven Wales LHBs, the study covers the period from October 2010 through March 2013.

Research

The OHE Research programme stimulates
discussion and debate about critical issues
in health economics and health care policy
at the UK, European and international levels. 

Although specifics vary over time, OHE research 
falls into three categories: the financing and 
delivery of health care, health technology 
assessment methods and processes, and the
economics of the life sciences and
pharmaceutical industries.

O’Neill, P., Mestre-Ferrandiz, J., Puig-Peiro, R. and Sussex, J.

Research Paper
January 2014

The Pharmaceutical Price Regulation Scheme (PPRS) 2014 Heads of Agreement, announced on 6 November 2013, outlines the terms of the five-year deal between the pharmaceuctical industry and the government in the UK. For the first time, the PPRS caps future growth in the NHS's branded medicines bill, between 2014 and 2018.

Karlsberg Schaffer, S., Sussex, J., Devlin, N. and Walker, A.

Research Paper
December 2013

This research examines the use of QALY thresholds in NHS Scotland in 2012-13 for health services that were "at the margin", i.e. those for which investment or disinvestment was planned or occurred.

The study was based on information from three sources: public information from the Scottish Parliament's examination of the NHS Boards' expenditure plans, interviews with the Finance Directors of Scotland's territorial NHS Boards, and a literature review.

Dakin, H., Devlin, N., Feng, Y., Rice, N., O'Neill, P. and Parkin, D.

Research Paper
November 2013

In this Research Paper, the authors explore which factors have most influenced NICE decisions from 1999 through the end of 2011. The research has two objectives: identifying the influence of cost-effectiveness and other factors on NICE decisions, and investigating whether NICE’s decision making has changed over time.

Cubi-Molla, P., de Vries, J and Devlin, N.

Research Paper
July 2013

Significantly increases of wealth and health in the Western world over the past 50 years do not appear to have produced an equivalent increase in societal happiness, at least not using traditional measures. As a result, policy makers now are looking more closely at alternative ways of measuring the welfare of society, including measures of subjective well-being.

Garau, M., Shah, K., Sharma, P. and Towse, A.

Research Paper
May 2013

Is the Link Between Health and Wealth Considered in Decision Making? Results from a Qualitative Study

Sussex, J., Rollet, P., Garau, M., Schmitt, C., Kent, A. and Hutchings, A.

Research Paper
May 2013

The purpose of this research is to identify the attributes to include in a value framework for orphan medicinal products (OMPs), determine their relative importance using a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) process, and test whether an MCDA approach can support decision making in practice.

O’Neill, P., Mestre-Ferrandiz, J., Puig-Peiro, R. and Sussex, J.

Research Paper
April 2013

Medicines account for less than 10% of total NHS expenditure in the UK. Because spending on medicines is easy to separate out, however, this sector continues to come under particular scrutiny in efforts to manage costs. Forecasting spending on medicines can be useful in planning NHS resource allocation. Simple extrapolations of past trends in medicines expenditure, however, are insufficient because they cannot account for shifts in the mix of medicines available on the market or the appearance of generics.

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