Monograph

Towse, A. and Firth, I.

Monograph
July 2020

This year’s OHE lecture addresses the question: how should the world pay for a COVID-19 vaccine? Adrian Towse, Emeritus Director of OHE and Senior Research Fellow presents the challenges that we face in developing a COVID-19 vaccine,and suggests a mechanism for buying the vaccine on a global scale. This paper was published alongside the lecture but contains additional analysis, extensive footnotes and references. Comments and feedback are welcome.

Frank, R.

Monograph
March 2020

The ‘opioid epidemic’ in the US is the most recent drug-abuse challenge from the misuse of prescription medicines or the use of illicit drugs. It is a particularly difficult challenge because thousands of patients benefit from the prescription pain killers that originally fuelled the crisis. Ceasing production and use of such medications, then, is not the right answer. But the crisis has recently entered a more lethal phase, one that involves the use of illicit synthetic opioids which are both more addictive and more deadly.

 

Smith, P.

Monograph
January 2019

Debate about funding has highlighted the difficulty of persuading sceptics that the NHS is a good use of public finance. There is a widely held view – particularly in finance ministries and some sections of the media – that health systems such as the NHS are ‘black holes’, constantly demanding increased funding without concomitant returns to society.

Case, A., and Deaton, A.

Monograph
March 2018

Low levels of mortality are important indicators of societal success. This lecture is about trends in mortality in the white non-Hispanic population in the United States of America (US), a subject which is not only interesting in itself, but also of global significance because we are all wondering whether this could happen to our own societies or to specific groups within them. The lecture was delivered by Professor Case, Sir Angus added some further reflections and then both professors engaged in a question and answer session at the end. The work discussed here, which is part of a much larger research agenda, leads to comparisons between the US and what might be happening in Europe.The authors’ most recent work on the topic of mortality rates is summarised in three papers (Case and Deaton 2015, 2017a, 2017b; there are links to these papers at https://scholar.princeton.edu/accase/publications).

This version of the text is based on a transcript of the lecture and, as such, is often less formal and more colloquial than might be expected in an academic paper.

Davies, Sally C.

Monograph
June 2017

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), created in April 2006, is a “virtual” organisation often referred to as the research arm of the NHS. It funds health and care research in the UK, translating discoveries into practical products, treatments, devices and procedures, involving patients and the public in all its work. The NIHR also ensures that the NHS is able to support the research of other funders, thereby encouraging broader investment in, and economic growth from, health research.

Weinstein, M.

Monograph
December 2015

Professor Weinstein presents a comprehensive analysis of the differences in attitudes between the US and the UK around how cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) fits into the health care system.

Mills, A.

Monograph
January 2015

The 21st OHE Annual Lecture was given Professor Anne Mills, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, on the subject of Universal Health Coverage in low- and middle-income countries.

Teeling Smith, G. ed.

Monograph
July 1972

This paper is based on a symposium held at the Imperial College of Science and Technology by the Office of Health Economics in 1972.

McKenzie, J. ed.

Monograph
July 1969

Proceedings of a Symposium held at The Royal College of General Practitioners, London
15 September 1968

Maynard, A.

Monograph
January 2014

This monograph, based on Professor Maynard’s remarks at the 20th OHE Annual Lecture, explores the critical issue of ensuring the quality of care in the NHS. The lecture was delivered just five months after release of the Francis Report, which was the result of a public inquiry into serious failures in patient care at the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust. As with many such inquiries in the past, Francis’s recommendations envisioned more regulation.

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