Innovation

A new report today by the Office of Health Economics (OHE) called for a shake up in the way future antibiotics are to be rewarded in Europe so that biopharmaceutical companies can spend more to fight superbugs.

Forthcoming in the Oxford Handbook on the Economics of the Biopharmaceutical Industry, this paper describes the context of the problem of access to medicines in developing countries. The authors detail policies and proposals intended to increase access to both 'global' and 'neglected' diseases, including pricing, compulsory licensing, donations and 'push' and 'pull' mechanisms to stimulate R&D.

In forthcoming chapter in the Oxford Handbook on the Economics of the Biopharmaceutical Industry, experts in the field outline the evolution of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) through its use as part of health technology assessment. The authors also explore the theoretical and practical issues that have arisen as the result of using CEA of drugs to make decisions about resource allocation, pricing and use and offer some important recommendations.

This OHE publication is intended to inform and stimulate debate about the way different sorts of evidence and considerations are taken into account in decisions about new health care technologies. The authors argue for greater use of multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) as an aid to decision-making that is based on health technology assessment.

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is becoming a major global public health threat. In this new OHE Research Paper, the authors identify barriers to the development of new products and recommend a hybrid push-pull approach to encouraging innovation.

In December 2010, the UK Department of Health released a consultation document to elicit comments on ‘proposals for a new value-based system of pricing medicines which aims to recognise and reward innovation. The document sets out the principles that would underpin the move to value-based pricing, outlines how the new system could work across the UK and seeks views on a number of key issues’.

Summarised in this post is a just-released OHE Occasional Paper that examines the potentially positive impact of differential pricing in Europe and the overall negative effects of international reference pricing (IRP) measures.

This OHE Seminar Briefing recounts a presentation by Prof Henry Grabowski on US Priority Review Vouchers, intended to provide an incentive for the development of drugs for tropical diseases. One of the originators of the idea, he recounts the history of its development and examines the potential impact of PRVs.

Value-based pricing for new medicines, proposed as part of UK health care reform, would create a QALY-plus approach for drugs approved starting 1 January 2014. For new drugs, this would replace the current PPRS system. The implications for pricing and reimbursement, and innovation, are outlined by Prof Towse in this blog post.

At a recent OHE seminar, Prof Ben Martin (Science and Technology Policy Studies at SPRU, University of Sussex) presented the results of his extensive literature review and qualitative research on how the field of science policy research has evolved and advanced in the 50 years since its inception.

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