Innovation

This is the first in a series of posts that will review OHE’s contributions to advancing thought and stimulating innovative ideas in its three key research areas: financing and delivery of health care, HTA methods and processes, and the economics of the pharmaceutical and life sciences industries.

Just published by OHE researchers is a comprehensive analysis of what policy measures are needed to counter the growing global problem of antimicrobial resistance. Their key findings are summarised in this blog post.

In October 2009, the OHE published research that compared access to orphan medicinal products (OMPs) in selected European countries. At the request of the UK Orphan Medicines Industry Group [1], OHE recently updated to May 2011 some of the data included in that research.

Most patients in middle and low income countries (MLICs) lack insurance coverage and so pay out of pocket for prescription medicines; pricing commensurate with income thus becomes critical to access to drugs. In this paper, the authors examine what determines the prices that manufacturers charge for originator and generic drugs across countries at all income levels.

To date, the UK Government has not been specific about how VBP will be implemented, but has indicated that calculations of value will extend beyond the QALY approach currently used by NICE. The Department of Health has stated that it will include “the range of factors through which medicines deliver benefits for patients and society”.

OHE is making available as Occasional Papers drafts of two important chapters that will appear in the Oxford Handbook on the Economics of the Pharmaceutical Industry due out in 2012. One on access to drugs and vaccines in developing countries and the other on measuring value with pharmacoeconomics.

A new report today by the Office of Health Economics (OHE) called for a shake up in the way future antibiotics are to be rewarded in Europe so that biopharmaceutical companies can spend more to fight superbugs.

Forthcoming in the Oxford Handbook on the Economics of the Biopharmaceutical Industry, this paper describes the context of the problem of access to medicines in developing countries. The authors detail policies and proposals intended to increase access to both 'global' and 'neglected' diseases, including pricing, compulsory licensing, donations and 'push' and 'pull' mechanisms to stimulate R&D.

In forthcoming chapter in the Oxford Handbook on the Economics of the Biopharmaceutical Industry, experts in the field outline the evolution of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) through its use as part of health technology assessment. The authors also explore the theoretical and practical issues that have arisen as the result of using CEA of drugs to make decisions about resource allocation, pricing and use and offer some important recommendations.

This OHE publication is intended to inform and stimulate debate about the way different sorts of evidence and considerations are taken into account in decisions about new health care technologies. The authors argue for greater use of multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) as an aid to decision-making that is based on health technology assessment.

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