Innovation

Just published are the results of an OHE Lunchtime Seminar given by Prof Riccaboni, from the University of Trento. In this publication, he explores whether R&D productivity in the pharmaceutical industry has declined and, if so, why.

Just out is an OHE Research Paper that examines the issues. The authors note that diagnostics not only facilitate health gain and cost savings, but also provide information to inform patients’ decisions on interventions and to clarify how their behaviour may affect their health in future.

OHE's Dr Jorge Mestre-Ferrandiz is a visiting lecturer in the Department of Economics at City University London. As part of his 2012 activities, he recently gave a comprehensive lecture on the economics of the market for medicines in the UK.

Interest is growing in schemes that involve “paying for pills by results”, that is, “paying for performance” rather than merely “paying for pills”. Despite its intuitive appeal, this approach is is highly controversial and is disliked by many health care providers, policy makers, and pharmaceutical companies.

Over the past four years, OHE has been involved in research intended to examine more thoroughly the economic value of medical research in the UK. Understanding and maximising the value includes consideration of both direct and indirect returns when deciding research policies. Taking account of spillovers is essential.

During the last quarter of 2011, OHE team members were involved in discussions and presentations in a range of forums, covering each of OHE's three areas of focus. This post reviews their activities.

Increasingly, governments in the UK and throughout Europe see R&D driven growth as the best way out of the financial crisis. The Government identifies the 'UK’s world-class research base' as a key driver of economic growth. But does the evidence of returns from public investment in R&D match the rhetoric?

Join OHE for two exciting seminars, one on MCDA and the other on shifts in investment in R&D.

Antibacterial drug resistance is a serious and growing worldwide problem that threatens our ability to cure traditionally treatable diseases and to successfully perform numerous surgical procedures that rely on antibacterials. The current situation is due primarily to two causes: inappropriate use in humans and animals, and the decline in the development of new antibacterials, largely because of lower returns on investment in R&D. OHE has been very involved in both defining the challenge and thinking through possible responses.

This post reviews OHE's activities in September 2011 that contributed to advancing thought and stimulating innovative ideas in its three key research areas: financing and delivery of health care, HTA methods and processes, and the economics of the pharmaceutical and life sciences industries.

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