Innovation

Multi-indication pricing (MIP) involves setting a different price for each major indication approved for a medicine. We explore the feasibility of implementing MIP in the UK.

It is estimated that one in three people born in 2015 in the UK may develop dementia, and clinical development success rates for dementia drugs are consistently lower than those for other therapy areas.

This article looks at how theory could be put into practice suggesting ways to implement a differential pricing system for branded medicines in the EU that can enhance overall welfare.

The business model for antibiotics is broken. We looked at other industries facing conceptually similar challenges - particularly when the incentive for R&D is delinked from the volume of sales.

The OHE presented the following posters at ISPOR 17th Annual European Congress in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

ISPOR’s 17th Annual European Congress is scheduled for 8-12 November 2014 in Amsterdam. This is the second of two blog posts that outlines OHE’s involvement. (The first blog is available...

ISPOR’s 17th Annual European Congress is scheduled for 8-12 November 2014 in Amsterdam. OHE’s Adrian Towse is current President of ISPOR and involved in several sessions. Important research on a range of topics will be...

OHE long has been involved in analysing the nature of innovation and the effects of regulation. Two recent OHE presentations address the core issues.

Launched at a seminar in his honour May 2014, Portrait of a Health Economist: Essays by Colleagues and Friends of Bengt Jönsson is an impressive collection of essays commemorating Bengt’s lifetime contribution to health economics. He was one of the true pioneers in the field – his 1976 doctoral thesis was on cost-benefit analysis in public health and medical care. He has since published hundreds of papers, reports and book chapters worldwide.

Cancer Research UK has recently released a report completed for it by OHE and the Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU) at the University of Sussex that focuses on the strength and nature of interdependence in the funding of cancer research. As earlier OHE research has demonstrated, sources of funding for medical research—public, charity and private sector—are complementary in effect, not duplicative.

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