Innovation

A new paper, published last week in Applied Economics, by Dimitrios Kourouklis, Senior Economist at OHE, looks at the question of whether government funding increases public sector development of new medicines. Looking at public sector drug development in Europe, this paper suggests that government funding does have an impact on the research and development pipeline, particularly at the earlier stages of research for medicines targeting rare diseases.

Histology independent therapies are changing the picture of cancer treatment and in so doing don’t ‘fit the frame’ of value assessment. What are the key challenges on the pathway from regulatory to Health Technology Assessment and how can we bridge those? This blog summarises expert and audience insights from an OHE-led ISPOR Educational Session, held Nov 9th 2020.

Bernarda Zamora presented at the virtual event entitled ‘Value of Diagnostic Information in Heart Failure’, which was organised by Roche Diagnostics. The panel, composed of six experts representing a range of stakeholders across Europe, shared their insights and perspectives on the Value of Diagnostic Information (VODI), and explored policies and changes that need to be made to capture the outcomes of diagnostic information in heart failure treatment and management.

Case studies explored more and less successful practices when delivering healthcare across four priority areas (screening, disease management and standardised patient pathways, rational use of medicines and healthcare associated infections). Results were used to simulate cost-savings and patient outcomes that could potentially be realised with improvements in efficiency across the European Union of 27 countries and the United Kingdom.

This year’s OHE lecture addressed the question: how should the world pay for a COVID-19 vaccine? The paper by Adrian Towse and Isobel Firth accompanying the lecture is now published. It builds on work undertaken with Kalipso Chalkidou, Rachel Silverman and Ganesh Ramakrishnan from the Center for...

OHE authors develop a supply and demand model of pharmaceutical markets to analyse the social welfare distribution between consumers (payers) and developers (industry) to set an optimal cost-effectiveness threshold (CET).

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the necessity of finding health solutions in an unprecedentedly short length of time. However, the first treatments, tests and vaccines will only offer partial solutions. Competing follow-on technologies will offer better or complementary health benefits. It is essential that health systems do not put all of their eggs in one basket.

A move towards paying multiple prices for medicines (depending on what they are used for) could address a commonly cited problem in drug development and increase patient access. Our latest consulting report investigates whether key stakeholders are onboard.

In place of OHE’s 2020 Annual Lecture, Adrian Towse will give a webinar-lecture on June 25th on payment models for a COVID-19 vaccine.

He will be discussing options for funding the development and manufacture of a vaccine, reflecting on their strengths and weaknesses, considering what may happen with no regional or global collaboration. Analysis will consider the work of Gavi and others to construct a global vaccine market that delivers for all citizens.

The need for social distancing in light of COVID-19 has led to an unprecedented increase in reliance on digital technologies by both health care providers and patients. While the trend towards digitalisation of health care allows for potential improvements in access, its impact on health outcomes and health inequalities must be carefully considered to ensure they contribute to social welfare and not detract from it.

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