Countering AMR

OHE long has been involved in analysing the nature of innovation and the effects of regulation. Two recent OHE presentations address the core issues.

The OHE model takes into account the value to society of new antibiotics as well as the risks and rewards for payers and the entities developing the new drugs.
A new model aimed at encouraging the development of new antibiotics was presented recently by OHE’s Chris Hoyle, who collaborated with Adrian Towse and Jorge Mestre-Ferrandiz in designing the model.

Antibacterial drug resistance is a serious and growing worldwide problem that threatens our ability to cure traditionally treatable diseases and to successfully perform numerous surgical procedures that rely on antibacterials. The current situation is due primarily to two causes: inappropriate use in humans and animals, and the decline in the development of new antibacterials, largely because of lower returns on investment in R&D. OHE has been very involved in both defining the challenge and thinking through possible responses.

Just published by OHE researchers is a comprehensive analysis of what policy measures are needed to counter the growing global problem of antimicrobial resistance. Their key findings are summarised in this blog post.

A new report today by the Office of Health Economics (OHE) called for a shake up in the way future antibiotics are to be rewarded in Europe so that biopharmaceutical companies can spend more to fight superbugs.

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is becoming a major global public health threat. In this new OHE Research Paper, the authors identify barriers to the development of new products and recommend a hybrid push-pull approach to encouraging innovation.

Antimicrobial resistance to drugs is a growing global public health issue. The EU began a discussion in 2009 about which policies can best encourage the development of new antibiotics. New OHE research uses an economic model to indentify which incentives for innovation are likely to be most successful.

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